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Acidity as $\mathrm{pH}$ does affect many redox potentials. But the compound acidic character itself has no direct relation to reducing power. E.g. superacids like $\ce{HSO3F}$ or $\ce{H2F+ + SbF6-}$ have practically no reducing power. The former probably just against free fluorine or fluorinating compounds like $\ce{ClF3}$, the latter none at all.


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No. Acidic character is not related to reducing power. For example, nitric acid $\ce{HNO3}$ has no reducing properties. It is a strong acid and a strong oxidant, able to carry out the oxidation of copper metal $\ce{Cu}$ to $\ce{Cu^{2+}}$ ion.


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An Acidic compound donates protons (Lowry Brönsted definition) $$\ce{HI -> H+ + I-}$$ By releasing $\ce{H+}$, you need to note that the compound as a whole releases the proton. A reducing/oxidizing agent donates/accepts electrons into it's own shells, differentiating it from an acid. $$\ce{2HI + 2OH- -> 2H2O + I2 + 2e-}$$ Here, $\ce{I-}$ donates two ...


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