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2

As for experimental synthesis of plumbane, it most certainly has been done by Krivstun et al.[1], preceded by Jin and Taga[2]. The plumbane so obtained was stable enough to allow IR spectroscopy in [1] and chemical analysis in [2]. From Ref. [1]: For the hydride generation of $\ce{PbH4}$ , we used the scheme similar to that described in [2]. Figure 1 shows ...


1

Magnesium silicide is a somewhat strange beast, whose electronic structure has features that cannot be accounted for by just bonding between magnesium and silicon. Basically, magnesium silicide has some properties of a salt and some properties of an intermetallic compound. As an intermetallic compound we can expect it to reduce hydrogen, just as an elemental ...


6

One of the best known examples is nitroglycerin, $\ce{C3H5N3O9}$, which has $18$ oxygen atoms in two molecules whereas only $17$ are required to oxidize all the carbon and hydrogen in those molecules. Not surprisingly: In its undiluted form, nitroglycerin is a contact explosive, with physical shock causing it to explode. If it has not been adequately ...


7

As shown in the question, to fully oxidize one carbon and two hydrogen atoms you need three oxygens. Such a molecule, $\ce{HCOOOH}$, exists and it's called performic acid. It is used as a bleach and disinfectant and is explosive in high concentrations.


7

Ammonium dichromate $\ce{(NH4)2Cr2O7}$ is well known for being able to burn with its own oxygen. If you dip a match into a crucible containing about $10\text{–}\pu{15 g}$ of ammonium dichromate, it will start to burn softly and throw out sparks like an active volcano, according to the equation $$\ce{(NH4)2Cr2O7 -> N2 + Cr2O3 + 4 H2O}$$ This operation is ...


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Actually, the question is correct in citing the seeming "corroding" and not dissolving of "Aluminum" in the context of a strong base, like Lime (Calcium hydroxide), which is apparently commonly attacking Aluminum alloy structures, for example, from the release of CaO dust from cement plants. For example, see this question, to quote: I ...


3

Approximately 0.01 hour of searching, including the time taken to type in the search words, reveals this on Wikipedia: In hot concentrated hydrochloric acid, aluminium reacts with water with evolution of hydrogen, and in aqueous sodium hydroxide or potassium hydroxide at room temperature to form aluminates—protective passivation under these conditions is ...


1

There is another effect : relativity. In the 6th line of the periodic table (containing $\ce{Tl}$), relativity effect becomes important. Even though electrons have no velocity, their behavior does change as if outer electrons were moving at nearly the velocity of light. This was shown by Pekka Pyyko, Accounts of Chemical Research, Vol.$12$, No. $8, 1979$, p. ...


4

It can be explained by fajans' rules. As the positive charge on an atom increases its size decreases as a result polarising power increases. If polarising power increases then it distorts the electron cloud towards itself and hence ionic nature of the bond decreases. This is the reason why Thallium(I) chloride is more ionic than Thallium(III) chloride. ...


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