27 votes
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Is it possible to speed up radioactive decay?

It is possible to modify nuclear decay rates using chemistry, though it is rare and the effect is usually very small. Here I summarize the information available in this link. You may want to see the ...
Nicolau Saker Neto's user avatar
19 votes
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Are there any actual uses of isodiaphers?

In practical radiochemistry, the term is rarely needed but it is not useless. In particular, isodiaphers are used in radiochemistry to describe chains of alpha decays. I would expect, the relative ...
Loong's user avatar
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15 votes

How come nuclear waste is so radioactive when uranium is relatively stable with an extremely long half life?

The radioactivity associated with nuclear waste does not come from naturally occurring uranium, but from products associated with processing and using uranium. First off, uranium as it occurs in ...
Oscar Lanzi's user avatar
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13 votes
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How come nuclear waste is so radioactive when uranium is relatively stable with an extremely long half life?

Radioactive isotopes (radionuclides to be more correct) are thermodynamically able to change into another nuclide, this decay has to be an exothermic event. For example if we consider beta decays for ...
Nuclear Chemist's user avatar
12 votes

Are there any actual uses of isodiaphers?

The isodiapher concept provides a means of organizing stable nuclei. In this corner... An atomic nucleus with more than one nucleon (if it is smaller than a neutron star) essentially represents a ...
Oscar Lanzi's user avatar
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9 votes
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Why does radioactive matter decay in series of half-lives?

There are fewer decays because there are fewer atoms to decay The simple reason why the number of decays (strictly, the number of decays per unit time) decreases in simple radioactive decay is ...
matt_black's user avatar
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9 votes

Kinetics of a simultaneous parallel radioactive decay

The question has already been solved by Yashwini and the answer given is correct.$^2$ A more intuitive and specific to question explanation would follow here. Now, the two reactions given are: \begin{...
8 votes
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Why can't a reverse fission reaction be automatically classified as a nuclear fusion reaction?

The Wikipedia article on Nuclear Fusion starts off: In nuclear physics, nuclear fusion is a reaction in which two or more atomic nuclei come close enough to form one or more different atomic nuclei ...
MaxW's user avatar
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8 votes
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Decay scheme of sodium-24

For energy levels in nuclei (and their gamma emission) the first place to look is at the Evaluated Nuclear Structure Data Files. I usually use the Brookhaven site, but there may be a closer mirror to ...
Jon Custer's user avatar
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8 votes
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Kinetics of a simultaneous parallel radioactive decay

Parallel or side reactions of the first order: Concept $$\require{cancel}\\ \ce{A ->[k_1] B} \ \ t=0\\ \ce{A ->[k_2] C} \ \ t=t$$ $$-\frac{\mathrm d[A]}{\mathrm dt}=k_1[A] + k_2[A] $$ $$-\frac{\...
Yashwini's user avatar
7 votes
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Can you decay to half an atom?

To clear up what are becoming confusing comments. An atom is a nucleus of protons and neutrons surrounded by electrons. An atom can decay by fission to make two or more atoms with a smaller number ...
StephenG - Help Ukraine's user avatar
7 votes

What makes an isotope stable?

There is a shell structure within the nucleus also. So the neutron/proton ratio varies from 1:1 for the light elements to 1.5 for the heavy elements. Note: I ripped off the image from another ...
MaxW's user avatar
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7 votes
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Why are rare earth metals and platinum group metals are often found clustered together in ores

The factors that generate mineral concentrations are complex and often only partly known Introduction: geology is complicated The one thing we can be very certain about is is that the distribution of ...
matt_black's user avatar
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7 votes

Can actinides form diamagnetic coordination complexes?

Shoubhik's comment mentions actinium, but thorium offers a more common example. The relativistic effects referred to in the OP actually have relatively little chemical impact in the early groups of ...
Oscar Lanzi's user avatar
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7 votes

Have we ever managed to "add" a proton to a nucleus?

You do not need the extreme conditions of accelerators or nuclear fusion. Nuclear reactions with protons can be observed even in the pure water of light-water-moderated fission reactors. By collisions ...
Loong's user avatar
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6 votes
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Nuclear chemistry home made

Yes, this really happened, probably (it's not a peer-reviewed effort). The reactor is a Farnsworth fusor, a very low-density, low-rate inertial-confinement reactor. They're surprisingly easy to build ...
jeffB's user avatar
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6 votes
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How are fission products formed?

There are many immediate primary fission products, with 2 probability peaks near 2/5 and 3/5 of original uranium-235 nucleon number. By other words, there are multiple ways how the nucleus can be ...
Poutnik's user avatar
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6 votes

What would the maximum energy density of a power source based on carbon-14

The maximum theoretical power density of isotopically pure $\ce{^14C}$ can be estimated from the nuclear decay data of $\ce{^14C}$ as follows. The half-life of $\ce{^14C}$ is $T_{1/2}=5.70\cdot 10^3\ \...
5 votes

Fluorine isotopes and isomers

Just like electrons nuclei can exist in a number of quantised states. We see evidence of this when, during radioactive decay, a gamma ray is produced. This is a nucleus in an excited state decaying to ...
Ian Bush's user avatar
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5 votes

Which element has the highest binding energy per nucleon

Can't be expertly comment on the plot without knowing exactly how the plot was constructed. But I can make the following observations... User Mithoron makes a good point that it depends on how the Y-...
MaxW's user avatar
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5 votes

Why does radioactive matter decay in series of half-lives?

It is a general principle, not limited to nuclear chemistry, but is common for many areas, e.g. for the reaction kinetic of the 1st order. All processes, where the value time rate is proportional to ...
Poutnik's user avatar
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5 votes

In the gold foil experiment why didn't thallium form?

The Rutherford formula, as derived, assumes purely elastic scattering from the Coulomb force. No formation of a compound nucleus is considered. Generally, for most of the initial experiments, the ...
Jon Custer's user avatar
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4 votes
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Why do Alpha particles not collide with electrons during alpha decay?

Actually they do collide. But, the emitted alpha particle carries much more energy than the binding energy of the electron(s) in a helium atom or $\ce{He^+}$ ion. Therefore such a collision scatters ...
Oscar Lanzi's user avatar
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4 votes

Can you decay to half an atom?

The photodisintegration of $\ce{^{9}_{4}Be}$ might come close to what you are looking for. When high energy photons excite a beryllium-9 nucleus it may decay into a neutron and two helium-4 nuclei ($\...
aventurin's user avatar
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4 votes
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Instability due to neutrons

The key here is that a system will tend towards the lowest energy state; in other words, for a process to be spontaneous, the final state must have lower energy than the initial state. The mass of a ...
Marcel's user avatar
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4 votes

Why does atomic charge not balance in nuclear reactions?

There are two reasons why nuclear reactions don't consider (or often account for) charge. The first is that charge is usually irrelevant to the reactions. If we are looking at changes in nuclei we ...
matt_black's user avatar
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4 votes
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If there is no destruction of mass in the nuclear fission , then how is tremendous energy is released?

Your question is based on the false assumption that the mass of nucleus is equal the sum of masses of respective count of free protons and neutrons. So you erroneously identify the nucleon numbers ...
Poutnik's user avatar
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