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1

So the diagram your referring to is called a Fischer projection and represents the non-cyclic form of glucose (usually when glucose is in the presence of water, it reacts to form it’s cyclic structure). When looking at the Fischer projection, take note of the four carbons in the middle of the linear structure. These are chiral carbon atoms. The way the other ...


2

According to Hund's rule of Maximum Multiplicity, a higher spin multiplicity is more stable. In simple terms, this means that a given atom would try to have the maximum number of unpaired electrons. For Osmium, which has a $\mathrm{5d^6}$ configuration, there are 5 d-orbitals and 6 electrons to fill, so the maximum number of unpaired electrons in this ...


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That is a terrible way of drawing that intermediate. You should draw a cyclohexane, then right-click on the four bonds where the delocalization takes place and choose double -> tautomeric.


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We consider mixing of $\ce{H2SO4(aq)}$ and $\ce{Ca(OH)2}$ in molar ratio 2:1. Molecular equation version: $$\ce{2 H2SO4 + Ca(OH)2 -> Ca(HSO4)2(aq) + 2 H2O}$$ Eventually if $[\ce{Ca^2+}][\ce{SO4^2-}] = [\ce{Ca^2+}] \cdot K_\mathrm{a2} \cdot \frac {[\ce{HSO4-}]}{[\ce{H3O+}]}> K_{\mathrm{sp,}\ce{ CaSO4}}$ ($\mathrm{p}K_\mathrm{a2}=1.99$): $$\ce{Ca(HSO4)2(...


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I am not sure where your solutions come from but 4.42a isn't correct. The products are calcium sulfate and water, and not, as Poutnik points out, $\ce{HSO4-}$. So the molecular formula should finish like this: $\ce{Ca(OH)2(aq) + H2SO4(aq) -> CaSO4(aq) + 2H2O(l)}$ Calcium sulfate is actually pretty insoluble so would normally appear as a precipitate but ...


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