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The state (sol) or (solv.) stands for "solvated". Since you are dissolving $\ce{HF}$ in liquid $\ce{SbF5}$, there is no water in that system (which would cause hydrolysis). So it is not correct to use (aq), since it is a nonaqueous system. Here are some other examples: Autoprotolysis of liquid ammonia: $$\ce{2NH3 (l) <=> NH4+ (sol) + NH2- (sol)}$$ ...


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Overall science is not affected by whether you write subscript or a superscript or in line. Afterall all notation was invented by humans. When professor quibble over these things my suggestion for them is to read the problem of "How many angels can stand on the point of a pin?" Apparently when Constantinople was falling, allegedly scholars were discussing ...


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The at symbol @ universally means "at the site" or "at the rate of". It is routinely used in supramolecular chemistry to denote guest@host relationship because it follows the original designation of denoting the binding site; its shape resembles a guest (letter "a") entrapped within a host shell (circle sign "○") providing a visual cue for an intuitive ...


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