New answers tagged

0

While d- and l- are synonymous with (+) and (-), respectively, as the signs of optical rotation in modern terminology, such was not always the case in Fischer's day (~1891). The designation (d)-glucose in many instances was equivalent to today's (D)-glucose while (+)-glucose referred to the sign of dextrorotation. Rosanoff (J. Am. Chem. Soc., 1906, 28, 114) ...


-3

A possible (but sadly if correct) answer could be a non-science teacher filling in for a position in which they are not very competent. With respect directly to the science, a chemistry professional would immediately know that scandium methanoate refers equally to scandium formate, or there is a typo and the answer is scandium carbonate. The error in not ...


13

The usage of non-standard prefixes such as "iso" has never been defined with hard, unambiguous rules such as those in the IUPAC recommendations. Instead, their usage has often more been "by convention". In Organic Chemistry (1st ed.) by Clayden et al., the authors write (p 315): Strictly speaking, if the standard meaning of ‘iso’ is followed, the name ...


3

You have already found out that the carboxylic acid group is the principal characteristic group. Therefore, the ester group has to be expressed as a prefix. The corresponding rule in Nomenclature of Organic Chemistry – IUPAC Recommendations and Preferred Names 2013 (Blue Book)) reads as follows. P-65.6.3.2.3 Esters cited as prefixes When, in an ester ...


9

There's a technicality in that the 2013 IUPAC recommendations (Nomenclature of Organic Chemistry: IUPAC Recommendations and Preferred Names 2013 (Blue Book)) have slightly awkward preferred IUPAC names for simple amines like these. The preferred IUPAC name for your molecule is "N,N-dimethylethanamine" (as described by P-62.2.2.1 on p 671, but note that there ...


Top 50 recent answers are included