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My take is that the terms "inorganic benzene" and "inorganic graphite" are meant to relay thoughts of both structural and chemical likeness to organic counterparts; however, graphite is not an organic compound since it is not a compound. It is an allotrope of carbon, just like diamond, buckminsterfullerene and graphene. The IUPAC ...


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The parent hydrocarbon chain for this molecule will be the 7 membered ring. 2.There are no functional groups with suffixes. 3.A halogen substituent(Bromine) and two side chains are present. ( methyl and t-butyl or (1,1-dimethylethyl) ) Having identified all these we can proceed to numbering the parent hydrocarbon chain. After numbering the Parent ...


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I would not call graphite organic, but there is no clear-cut way of defining organic and inorganic compounds. To your question, the pairs of compounds are isoelectronic. That means that if we assume that molecular orbitals (MOs) arise from atomic orbitals, the corresponding MOs in the two compounds have the same occupancy. In these cases it arises because ...


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OED says for mono-: "before a vowel or h usually mon-." There's no such notation for di- (probably because a prefix that short can't afford to be reduced by 50%!). So there isn't a general rule in English or in chemistry that demands that identical vowels coalesce, but there is one that says that "mono-" is liable to drop its final "...


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"Monooxide" was previously used to describe compound with single oxygen before being replaced with "Monoxide". Instance of "Monooxide" can be found in papers from 20th century which later became obsolete. Here is an example: Reference: Official Gazette of the United States Patent and Trademark Office: Patents, Volume 1055, ...


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Both "monooxide" and "monoxide" are used in the literature, yet "monoxide" is being used more often (Google Books Ngram Viewer). Although this is an accepted elision, it is not the preferred one, and must not set a precedent for other cases when multiplicative prefix ends with the same vowel as the root word begins with, such ...


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Although it seems like a question of English language phonetics, monoxide is not an exception but a general trend. Mon(a)oxide (vowel "o" dropped), Dioxide (no "a" vowel in the prefix) Trioxide (no "a" vowel in the prefix) Tetr(a)oxide (vowel a dropped) Pent(a)oxide (vowel a dropped). The accepted spelling of diiodide is di-...


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There are two little clues you can use. First, mercury(I) isn’t actually present as $\ce{Hg+}$; the cationic species is actually $\ce{Hg2^2+}$ with a $\ce{Hg-Hg}$ bond. Thus, if this were a mercury(I) compound, the sum formula would be $\ce{Hg2[Co(SCN)4]2}$. This obviously only helps you if the correct formula was supplied as part of the question but the ...


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As far as I am concerned, your attempt was incorrect. You must use a parent chain with the highest number of carbon molecules. If I am not mistaken, if a cyclic carbon chain has the same number of carbon molecules as a straight carbon chain, the cyclic carbon chain should be the parent chain. In addition to what I said above, according to the current version ...


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Assuming that "term" in your question refers to chemical nomenclature, the authoritative source of information would be the current edition of IUPAC Red Book [1]. From [1, p. 70]: IR-5.3.2.2 Monoatomic cations The name of a monoatomic cation is that of the element with an appropriate charge number appended in parentheses. […] $\ce{I+}$ iodine(1+) ...


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Skepticism is an integral part of a good scientist. Remember the motto "Paper never refused ink" when reading papers and its Supporting Information. You will find incorrect references (very frequent), occasionally wrong calculations, wrong formulae, or wrong names as you read more and more papers just because scientists, like normal human beings, ...


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According to Nomenclature of Organic Chemistry: IUPAC Recommendations and Preferred Names 2013 (Blue Book) (P-62.6.1), Salts of tetravalent nitrogen $\ce{R4N+X-}$ (where one $\ce{R}$ group represents the parent hydride of the amine or imine and the other groups are hydrogen atoms or substituent groups) are named by one of the following methods: (1) by ...


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If you name two groups that are the same in priority, name it alphabetically. Since b comes before e, butyl is before ethyl. The first answer is correct.


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It is according to IUPAC rules that while naming alkyl substituted amines, we add a prefix of N before it. In this case also, it is the same... nevertheless, your reasoning of no ambiguity over dropping the prefix N is correct, but the name would not be Methylmethanamine (incorrect), instead it would be dimethylamine which is also correct.


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$\ce{HCOOCH3}$ would likely be rendered as $\ce{H-C(O)-O-CH3}$, the lone hydrogen atom is atttached to the carbonyl group instead of the methyl group being there -- in other words, methyl formate instead of acetic acid. I suppose that $\ce{HOCOCH3}$ could be interpreted as having the methyl group and hydroxyl group attached to the carbonyl, but you're better ...


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