New answers tagged

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I'm adding this answer as maybe reasoning of why IUPAC proposed putting the charge symbol after the number. Consider it a supplement to the @fred-senese's answer of 'cause IUPAC says so, and the linked article. We put the charge symbol (+ or -) after the number because charges are entities, not numbers. Placing the number before the symbol helps to keep the ...


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According to the current version of Nomenclature of Organic Chemistry – IUPAC Recommendations and Preferred Names 2013 (Blue Book), a structure with two or more identical units that are linked by di- or polyvalent groups can be named in two ways: by ordinary substitutive nomenclature, in which one of the parent structures is chosen as the senior parent ...


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Generally, the complete information about a structure is explicitly given by the name and does not rely on any implied information. Nevertheless, the practice of omitting locants when there is no ambiguity is widespread in general nomenclature. For preferred IUPAC names, however, locants are omitted only in a few exceptional cases described in Subsection P-...


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Just to add another resource besides the excellent find by Nilay, in Organic Chemistry, The Name Game, it mentions ester from German Essigäther (acetic ether) an early name for ethyl acetate The unabridged Oxford English Dictionary (by subscription only) also mentions that Gmelin called these compounds as napthas but later he changed it to ester. H. Watts ...


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The term "Essigäther" is actually the German name for ethyl acetate i.e Essig = "vinegar" + Äther = "ether". "vinegar" becomes acetic, hence ethyl acetate becomes "acetic ether". (etymoline.com) But, ethyl acetate is an ester. So, why is it named "acetic ether"? According to Leopold Gmelin, ester ...


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According to Nomenclature of Organic Chemistry – IUPAC Recommendations and Preferred Names 2013 (Blue Book), the preferred IUPAC name of the compound $\ce{H2N-CH=NH}$ is methanimidamide. The name formimidamide may be used in general nomenclature. The name formamidine is no longer recommended. The letter locants ‘N’ and ‘N'’ are used to differentiate among ...


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The 2 and 3 are just the second and third carbons in the longest carbon chain. For instance, take the molecule 1-chloro-1-fluoroethane. When you draw out the molecule, look for all carbons where there are four different $\ce{R}$-groups, or side chains, attached. This means the carbon they are attached to is a chiral center. If a molecule has a chiral center, ...


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When naming a organic compound, S/R-notation comes if there is a chiral atom present. The S/R-notation always accompanies a numerical such as (2S,3R)- where the numerical refers to the chiral carbon position in the molecule according to the IUPAC numbering while R and S representate the orientation of the chiral atom according to the Cahn–Ingold–Prelog ...


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You appear to have an understanding of R/S nomenclature. The numbers, 2 and 3, are simply the carbons that are stereogenic. In the compounds shown below, the carbon bearing the hydroxyl group is C2 and not C3 because the hydroxyl group has priority over the bromine. Of course, carbon numbering begins at the terminus of the chain proximate to the hydroxyl ...


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I would be hesitant to apply the term transition metal chalcogenide to $\ce{CrSbX3}$ – and for the others, it depends on what the actual structure on a molecular level is. A term like transition metal chalcogenide (to me) invokes the idea of the transition metal and the chalcogen being in close contact. Basic examples would include iron sulphide (where there ...


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As said by Oscar Lanzi, they are called "ternary metal chalcogenides". However, the name depends on the type of metal present in the compound. From here: Systems to be studied include the layered intercalates $\ce{AMX2}$ (A=alkali metal; $\ce{X=S, Se, Te}$) which are potential ionic conductors suitable for use in solid state batteries: Group 2 ...


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According to both PubChem and Wikipedia, the IUPAC name of Doxorubicin is (7S,9S)-7-[(2R,4S,5S,6S)-4-Amino-5-hydroxy-6-methyloxan-2-yl]oxy-6,9,11-trihydroxy-9-(2-hydroxyacetyl)-4-methoxy-8,10-dihydro-7H-tetracene-5,12-dione, which probably is the correct naming. To answer your question about why $\ce{-OCH3}$ is number 4 (actually it is number 4, not 3 as you ...


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I have separated C1 and C3 into unique structures. For C1, it is clear that the oxygen of the hydroxyl group has the top priority while the methylene group has the lowest priority. A digraph is constructed such that we delineate two paths around each of the unsaturated rings. Thus, non-duplicate atoms C3 and C5 terminate with their respective duplicate atoms ...


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According to the new recommendations of IUPAC nomenclature rules, when choosing the senior parent structure, you have to first consider the senior parent structure, which has the maximum number of substituents corresponding to the principal characteristic group or senior parent hydride in accord with the seniority of classes (functional groups). Then, if ...


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"Formyl" and "oxo" are used to denote when the aldehyde group is a substituent/carbon skeleton component respectively. Seeing as the aldehyde group is clearly in the main chain, the "oxo" prefix must be used and therefore the second option must be the correct one. Regardless of this, seeing as the carboxylic acid group must have ...


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