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The scientist who coined the term polymer, Jöns Jacob Berzelius, used the word to refer to different substances which had the same empirical formula. In this sense, benzene is a polymer of ethyne (acetylene), because benzene $\ce{C6H6}$ and ethyne $\ce{C2H2}$ have the same empirical formula, namely $\ce{CH}$. In other words, all substances with molecular ...


6

Short answer: Yes and No, depending if we consider polymer(1) or polymer(2). Long answer: The first step in decision "Is X A or not ?" must be clarification what we mean by "A". Benzene is a cyclic trimer of ethyne. Trimers are a special case of polymers(1) as repeated monomer structures, being a superset of oligomers and polymers(2). ...


4

The first name has the correct alphabetical order of groups: ethyl before dimethyl. The "d" of dimethyl is not involved in alphabetizing. The numbering is correct because the one-to-one comparisons of locants is {1,2,4 < 1,3,4}. The correct name is 4-ethyl-1,2-dimethylcyclohexane. For a brief set of IUPAC rules applicable to this question see, ...


2

According to the IUPAC nomenclature, preference for placing prefixes is given in accordance with alphabetical order (just like in a standard English dictionary). It has nothing to do with the number of letters in a prefix. Since "P" in heptyl comes before "X" in hexyl, heptyl will be placed before hexyl in IUPAC nomenclature. Hence, the ...


2

A chemist would not refer to sodium hypochlorite solution as ‘liquid chlorine’ – the term is instead reserved for chlorine that has been cooled to below $\pu{35^\circ C}$ and has thus condensed to a yellow liquid. The easiest way to prepare it is probably to cool a container to $\pu{-78^\circ C}$ using dry ice and acetone and pass chlorine gas through said ...


2

Short answer: No. No. Yes. Yes. No. Next time, try searching before posting. Longer answer: It is just a sale trick. Chemistry community has no direct influence on used trademarks of commercial products. Some may call whiskey "liquid gold", but nobody expects there is any gold there. The product is called "liquid chlorine" just because it ...


2

The prefix neo- is only used with pentane. It has a historical origin. In the $19$th century, the first $\ce{C_5H_{12}}$ that has been discovered was our n-pentane. At that time it was simply called pentane. After some time, a second $\ce{C_5H_{12}}$ was discovered. Today we know that it is methylbutane. As it was an isomer of pentane, the chemists decided ...


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