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The answer to this question is actually pretty interesting, I think. @user55119 's comment that the principal chain is the cyclohexane ring is correct -- but it seems like you understand that that's what the teacher is saying, and you're asking, "why?" The best short answer, too, is imho in your comments: @MaxW 's "naming organic compounds ...


3

The accepted answer is incorrect There are some subtleties in the determination of stereochemistry in this question which need to be carefully explained with reference to the official rules, as laid out in Nomenclature of Organic Chemistry: IUPAC Recommendations and Preferred Names 2013 (Blue Book). The gist of it is similar to that provided in other sources,...


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The basic principle in nomenclature is to look for the longest carbon chain: here it is the chain with 3 carbon atoms so the suffix prop; since it is an amine connecting to the carbon 2 it gives the suffix propan-2-amine. As you have a $ \ce {CH_3} $ group grafted in position 2 of the main carbon chain, you must add the prefix 2-methyl So you have 2-...


1

As of Loong's suggestion, I'd put the answer removing it from comment section: The name should be 4,4-dibromo-3,5-dichloro-2,5-difluoro-3,5-diiodo-pentan-2-ol as Maurice pointed out. However, keep in mind that there are 3 chiral centers within the molecule. But, the indicated name is okay since stereochemistry of the molecule is not shown. If $\ce{OH}$ group ...


1

You are right on this point: it is not an alcohol because there is no $\ce{-OH}$ group ; it is an ether oxide. To name it, we are looking for the largest carbon chain: here it is $ \ce {CH_3 -CH_2 -CH_2-CH_2-CH_2-CH_2-CH_2-CH_3} $ with 8 carbon atoms so the suffix of the compound is octane. We then add as a prefix the smallest carbon chain (here 2 carbon ...


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