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Per a google search: Alloy 316/316L is molybdenum-bearing austenitic stainless steel. The higher nickel and molybdenum content in this grade allows it to demonstrate better overall corrosion resistant properties than 304, especially with regard to pitting and crevice corrosion in chloride environments. Also, another source on Alloy 316L : Cr Chromium ...


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As a comment of Karl's message, I would like to add that chromite $\ce{FeCr_2O_4}$ is the most important Chromium mineral. When mixed with $8$ times its weight of sodium carbonate, and heated to high temperature, $\ce{Na_2CO_3}$ melts at $850°$C and reacts with chromite and air according to $\ce{8 Na_2CO_3 + 4 FeCr_2O_4 + 7 O_2 -> 8 Na_2CrO_4 + 2 ...


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"To fuse" is another word for "to melt" (e.g. "heat of fusion"). Specifically, if you say you want to fuse two materials, you melt them in the hope that they will mix. In this case, you melt the carbonate, and hope that the chromite will dissolve in it. Because e.g. $\ce{Cr2O3}$ has a melting point of $\pu{2435 °C}$, chromite ($\ce{Fe(II)Cr2O4}$) typically ...


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The main use of Rinmann's green is analytical. It may be used to identify small amounts of zinc in a mixture. If a precipitate containing metal hydroxides and sulfides is burnt and calcined on a porcelain lid in a Bunsen flame, one may usually obtain a white or grayish mass. If now one drop of a diluted solution of $Co(NO_3)_2$ is added to the mass, and then ...


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Due to it being a weak chromophore and relatively expensive than chromium(III) oxide, its use as a pigment has become obsolete. Since it is kind of malleable and it is resistant to oxidation, it is hence used for sheeting, coating galvanized iron, etc. It is used in making brass and other alloys, and is also largely consumed in electric batteries. Also, it ...


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I can't really imagine that it's used as pigment. First of all it contains cobalt in comparison to the less harmful Cr(III). Another thing that bothers me about the compound is its composition. While Thenard's Blue is what we call a spinel-structure, Rinman's Green isn't one. Although textbooks sometimes tell you this and quite often students try to convince ...


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