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7

It is unlikely that there is a simple method, not involving relatively expensive chemical analysis, for distinguishing 4N, 5N, and 6N copper specimens. Shown below is a photograph of some copper specimens I have: The evaporating dish contains copper shot, the large plate (4.76 mm thick) is OFHC (oxygen free high conductivity) copper and the third specimen ...


5

One of the oldest reputable sources that I managed to find allowing to define what "uraneous oxide" is, was Roscoe's Lessons in Elementary Chemistry [1, p. 253] (strong emphasis mine): URANIUM. Symbol U, Combining Weight 240, Specific Gravity 18·4. Uranium is a metal which occurs but sparingly in nature, existing combined in two somewhat rare ...


3

According to Nickel Metal Hydride (NiMH): Handbook and Application Manual of Energizer Nical Metal Hydride: The nickel-metal hydride battery chemistry is a hybrid of the proven positive electrode chemistry of the sealed nickel-cadmium battery with the energy storage features of metal alloys developed for advanced hydrogen energy storage concepts. This ...


3

The cathode is made of $\ce{NiOOH}$ when the cell is new. This can also be written $\ce{NiO(OH)}$,where the oxidation degree of $\ce{Ni(III)}$ is more evident. The cathode is made of $\ce{Ni(OH)2}$ when the cell is discharged. Whatever the nature of the anode (cadmium, hydrogen, or any other material), the cathode is working according to the equation $$\ce{...


2

Pure iron is more corrosion resistant than regular steel. Also there is an alloy of iron named wrought iron which has very low carbon content, and that makes it more resistance to corrosion, but steel has better strength. I think also Eiffel tower was made out of wrought iron. From the Wikipedia article about wrought iron: Wrought iron is an iron alloy with ...


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