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12

Most likely, mercury was used as a colorant, specifically red. This list shows mercury providing a red color in flame tests, and the same would presumably be seen in fireworks. Several other, less dangerous elements also give red or reddish colors. This site identifies lithium as providing the color in red fireworks, and also mentions lithium carbonate ...


9

Don't use a mixture, just use pure Hg. Chill to 4.2 K, conveniently reached with liquid He, and all magnetic fields are excluded. Levitate on a magnet, sans yogi. Mercury in a static magnetic field, with direct current, forms a simple homopolar electric motor, creating a vortex. A safer way (sans neurotoxic Hg) to demonstrate a homopolar motor requires just ...


9

In "Fireworks, the Art, Science, and Technique", Takeo Shimizu gives a very good explanation of color production. For blue, the color-producing firework chemical is thought to be copper monochloride. If there is no free chlorine in the flame, there can be no blue color.The discovery of colors produced by chlorine along with other elements belongs to Chertier,...


8

As iron is one of few metals not forming amalgams, Almost all metals can form amalgams with mercury, the notable exceptions being iron, platinum, tungsten, and tantalum. ..it should preferably contaminate the mercury surface. I would try, perhaps repeated, dropping mercury, e.g via punched filtration paper to sulphuric acid bath. It can be combined ...


6

The Diphenylcarbazide Test for the presence of mercury was used as early as 1920s. However, since the test is very delicate (the test can detect $\pu{250 \mu g/L}$ mercury in solution), it has been used predominantly in neutral solutions, until it have been adapted to Quantitative Analysis Scheme by Scott in 1929 (Ref.1) to ditect in acidic medium: The ...


5

In the beginning of the $20th$ century, the following procedure was developed to prove the presence of mercury in solution. One drop of the solution to be tested is deposited on a filter paper which had been dipped into a freshly prepared 1% alcoholic solution of diphenylcarbazide. Mercury salts produce a purple spot, even in a very diluted solution. ...


4

The process you described would be more appropriately called "reduction of mercury(II) to elemental mercury". Unfortunately, the trick with iron likely won't work (something more inert like copper would be a better choice though). Mercury(II) oxide is weakly basic, so mercury salts in general would easily undergo hydrolysis and form basic oxosalts in ...


3

To spare everyone watching the movie (and giving revenue to someone showing fake chemistry), here is a summary: A container labeled "27/27 | 99%999 | 1/Kg | 001200300 | RED MERCURY | W. GERMANY | WARNING - DANGEROUS | WARNING - OPEN IN LAP" containing a red liquid is first inverted, then a metal wire (safety pin) is placed on it. The metal wire ignites. ...


3

Keep in mind that "stabilizing" orbitals does not "prevent" electrons from being shared, only that they would be shared to a smaller extent. The very fact that mercury is a liquid and not a gas shows that there is some bonding in mercury, even if it is weaker than the bonding in most metals. So, it is conductive the same way other metals are, just less ...


2

Synthesis routes From molbase[dot]com : Phenylhydrazine + urea -> 1,5-Diphenylcarbazide ~96% yield Pasha; Madhusudana Reddy Synthetic Communications, 2009 , vol. 39, # 16 p. 2928 - 2934 Phenylhydrazine + urethane -> 1,5-Diphenylcarbazide + 1-Phenylsemicarbazide + Ammonia Journal of the Chemical Society, vol. 53, p. ...


2

There are several redox reactions can be taken place when you add household beach on elemental mercury metal. However, this question is more like a homework question. Thus, I give you insight to the answer and you may read a bit and find out what's happening. This reaction is studies and results have been published (Reference 1), the abstract of which states ...


1

Non-amalgamation of mercury with iron means that the iron is not dissolved, and therefore floats on the surface as a dross. However, non-amalgamation does not mean total insolubility. If a few ppm of iron needs to be removed, washing with a dilute solution of HNO3 might be best, with much agitation. There will be some dissolution of mercury to Hg++. That's ...


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