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We sometimes call this type of complex 'pseudotetrahedral' since there is an isomerism from a tetrahedral to a square planar complex possible. I was unable to find the original work here but this link gives some information. As you already mentioned there are two strong and two weak ligands so it's hard to tell how strong the ligand field splitting will be. ...


9

Dichlorobis(triphenylphosphine)nickel(II), or $\ce{NiCl2[P(C6H5)3]2}$ in square planar form is red and diamagnetic. The blue form is paramagnetic and features tetrahedral Ni(II) centers. Both tetrahedral and square planar isomers coexist in solutions. Weak field ligands, favor tetrahedral geometry and strong field ligands favor the square planar isomer. Both ...


5

To determine what orbitals do, it is often a good idea to look at the symmetry group as it can provide a rough overview over what can (symmetry-allowed) and cannot (symmetry-forbidden) happen. In the case of a quadruple bond such as $\ce{[Re2Cl4]^2-}$, we can approximate the rhenium(III) centres as being close to $C_\mathrm{4,v}$. A quick glance at the ...


3

Octahedral complexes are somewhat of a ‘standard’ for transition-metal complexes. Not only can they happen if there are too few electrons to satisfy the 18-electron rule (e.g. $\ce{[Ti(H2O)6]^3+}$, a $\mathrm d^1$ complex) but also if there are too many electrons to satisfy the 18-electron rule (Jahn-Teller distorted $\ce{[Cu(H2O)6]^2+}$, a $\mathrm d^9$ ...


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