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Although the comment by Ezze is a valid and helpful answer, according to chegg.com, the order of reaction with respect to the $\ce{H+}$ ion is $\ce{0}$ and therefore it can be omitted from the rate expression as $\ce{[H+]^0= 1}$.


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I tried to find the place where you found the two statements, and I could not. Absence of long-range forces The first statement makes sense to me: There are no intermolecular forces except during the collision between molecules. The OpenStax Chemistry textbook, for example, has this statement: Gases are composed of molecules that are in continuous ...


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It appears that you are correct in your thought process. Determining by how much the activation energy of the reaction is reduced requires you to basically find $$Δ(\%) = \frac{E_\mathrm{a1} - E_\mathrm{a2}}{E_\mathrm{a1}} × 100\% = \left(1 - \frac{E_\mathrm{a2}}{E_\mathrm{a1}}\right) × 100\%$$ There is a system of three independent equations $$ \begin{...


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