6

According to IUPAC Recommendations for chemical kinetics [1], rates $\nu$ are defined for reactant $\ce{B}$ and product $\ce{Y}$ as a time $(t)$ derivative of the amount $n$ (in general) or per unit volume $V$ (for the closed system): $$ \begin{array}{lll} \hline \text{System} & \text{Consumption} & \text{Formation} \\ \hline \text{Open} & \...


3

Yes, you are right, the reason primarily looking at it from a theoretical point of view is the high bond dissociation energy of $\ce{N#N}$ Let's look at this aspect from every point of view Theoretical- High bond dissociation energy of $\ce{N#N}$ Kinetics- We have the Arrhenius equation given below, which states the relationship between the rate constant ...


2

To summarize, and to answer the question, it is correct to say that the rate of a chemical reaction can be expressed in % per second if and only if the reaction is first order. This percentage is the first order rate constant $k$.


2

I suspect that you could be forming an aqueous solution of $\ce{(NH4)2PtCl6}$. I would like to make an observation as a person who has done platinum group metal chemistry, the anionic chloro complexes of PGMs like $\ce{PdCl4^2-}$ and $\ce{PtCl4^2-}$ are very toxic. They can induce a nasty allergy to PGMs. I would suggest that you do not work at home with ...


2

This answer is mostly a compilation of the excellent comments by Spontification and Chet Miller. Differential rate law The overall reaction order tells you what happens to the rate when you change all concentrations by the same factor at the same time. For example, if you decrease all concentrations by a factor 2 and the overall order is 1, the reaction ...


1

does the q value you find for the system equal to the ΔH value for the system? It seems that the reaction is undergoing at constant pressure. In that case, q value is indeed equal to the ΔH value for the system. Worded differently, does the kinetic energy change of the system equal to the enthalpy change of the system? q value is not the same as '...


1

Under the restrictions of constant $p$, and no non-$pV$ work, we have: $$q_p=\Delta H$$ q is the heat flow into the system (postive for flow in, negative for flow out). However, q is not necessarily the change in the system's kinetic energy. For instance, suppose you have an endothermic chemical reaction at constant temperature. Heat will flow into the ...


1

In the book that Wikipedia cites (Advanced Organic Chemistry: Reaction Mechanisms By Reinhard Bruckner, ISBN 9780080498805), they have a different set of assumptions. They are saying the formation of chlorine radicals proceeds by a fast equilibrium. Then, they say that the organic radical is at steady state, ignoring reaction (4) given by the OP (the ...


1

Your analysis of the expectation is correct, and we can look at it more quantitatively in this way: Since the hydroxide concentration is much higher than the CV concentration in all of the reactions, let's approximate it as unchanging. Assuming the reactions are first-order in each reactant, we have a rate law for the concentrated reaction of: $$-\frac{d[\...


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