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If such a reaction "$\ce{2A + 3B -> }$ products" occurs, it is the sum of several more elementary reactions, which are taking place successively. Some may be fast, some slower. The rate of the global reaction is the rate of the slowest of these elementary reactions. It can be first or second order, or it can even be more complicated, depending ...


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If $\ce{2A + 3B -> \text{product(s)}}$ describes the stoichiometry of a reaction, than you describe the balance of starting materials against products; this however does not state much about the kinetics, elemental (perhaps rate determining) steps, and overall reaction order described by kinetics. Uni- and bimolecular elemental steps are the most ...


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We can start by watching two videos showing how sugar and salt are dissolved in water: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fwjvwoFHTbg and https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=14iv71ZTRTo. Particularly, the second video is fun to watch, where molecular dynamics simulation is used to show how water molecule solvates an ion at the corner of a NaCl particle. To ...


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This is the complete question at the GenChem 2 level (found posted on Chegg): The correct answer is C. Of course, there is a relationship between most concepts, but not one where the speed of a reaction would reliably predict the sign of the standard Gibbs energy. Also, fast reactions is a fuzzy concept. A given reaction will be faster or slower depending ...


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There are electrode reactions controlled by electron transfer(slow ones) or by diffusion(fast ones). Depending on choice of forced electrode potentials, electrolyzer geometry and ion concentration, many reactions can be arranged to be electron-transfer limited or diffusion limited. If the cathode potential is decreased below its equilibrium potential, the ...


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You overthink it. It is just matter of eventual multiplication or division with respective stoichiometric coefficients. If there is an elementary reaction $$\ce{a A -> b B}$$ then for respective reaction, appearance and disappearance rates: $$\begin{align} R_\mathrm{r} &= k_\mathrm{r}[A]^a\\ R_\mathrm{a,B} = \frac {\mathrm{d[B]}}{\mathrm{d[t]}}=bR_\...


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As far as I can remember, I was taught in 6th grade that warm water would dissolve sugar with greater ease than cool water. That is true. Sometimes, the sugar in honey crystallizes. If you carefully heat up the honey, you can get it back to a liquid. So there is experimental evidence that sugar is more soluble as you heat up the solution. In 11th grade, I ...


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