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Vitamin E acetate, or α-tocopheryl acetate, exists in two forms: D-form (solid/highly viscous at 20 °C) and a racemate (viscous liquid at 20 °C). Interestingly enough, the difference in physical properties is well denoted in German Wikipedia article, whereas English Wikipedia omits this. Also, I noticed many authoritative sources arbitrarily listing a ...


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cis and trans are perfectly valid descriptors for linear disubstituted alkenes. The (E) and (Z) system is more comprehensive for alkenes, as it also covers trisubstituted and tetrasubstituted alkenes which cis/trans by definition cannot (although some might extend it anyway). In most cases, it would be perfectly reasonable and possible to replace every ...


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That is because the E/Z-system is an extension of the cis/trans-system. So both systems can be applied to a certain amount of structures and the E/Z-system is then able to treat more advanced systems. From my perception, it seems that Chemistry is a very stubborn … or maybe just very conservative … field where especially new naming conventions get hardly ...


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Geometrical isomers are compounds where all atoms are connected to the same atoms but their arrangement in space differs. This does include cis-trans isomers but in the context of coordination compounds also fac-mer isomers ($\ce{[MA3B3]}$ cases). The case of $\ce{[MA4BC]}$ is tricky. In principle, they show the same two possible arrangements that, if $\ce{...


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The approach is right, and your answers are right, but there are a couple of things to look at in your explanation. First, the presence of a chiral centre does not in itself make a compound chiral. It is in this case, but a molecule is chiral if, and only if, it is not superimposable on its mirror image. You could have a molecule with more than one chiral ...


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