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Neutralization vs Solvation vs Dilution: Semantically, the reaction of acid or base with water is (usually) solvation and dilution, not neutralization. Pure water $\ce{pH}$ (at $\pu{25^{\circ}C}$) is always 7, i.e. neutral. When you add an acid to water, you are dissolving the acid. The formation of $\ce{H3O+}$ ions necessarily lowers the $\ce{pH}$, away ...


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An acid/base neutralization will create a salt + water. is rather a secondary/junior high school teaching. It is rather $$\ce{AcidA + BaseB <=> BaseA + AcidB}$$ E.g.: $$\ce{NH3(base) + H2O(acid) <=> NH4+(acid) + OH-(base)}$$ When strong bases or acid dissolve in water, they completely dissociate: $$\ce{HCl(g) + H2O ->[H2O] H3O+(aq) + Cl-(aq)}...


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As other answers point out, the hydroxyl group in an alcohol is covalently bonded to carbon and thus is not the same as a hydroxide ion. But don't assume that the hydroxyl group lacks any basic character. It can still act as a Lewis base towards strong acids like $\ce{HCl}$, facilitating nucleophilic substitution reactions between alcohols and these strong ...


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Many people confuse between the three forms of the OH group. When the OH has a negative charge, it is called hydroxide, and it forms ionic compounds with cations. An example is sodium hydroxide, which contains discrete Na+ ions and OH- ions. When dissolved in water, it separates into Na+ ions and OH- ions (solvation not mentioned for simplicity) When the OH ...


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