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Ionic liquids have very special properties, the most important of those of interest is that they are liquids at low temperature with extremely low vapour pressure. This is in fact the main reason they have caused excitement among chemists. Quoting (1) from a report comparing the volatility of various ILs: An extremely low vapor pressure (e.g., ca. 100 pPa ...


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Ionic liquids are not magical liquids. They are just typical organic compounds with certain properties. These compounds generated a storm in the tea cup in the late 1990s and 2000s, but they are as toxic as other solvents. Certainly they have niche applications especially as a gas chromatography stationary phase, where they can be used at high temperature (...


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What's meant by stability is whether the compound "wants" to be in current state. If it wants to change the state (separated ions want to bond) then the system is less stable. In your example you can simply imagine 2 spherical magnets placed close to each other - they would rush towards one another. They had potential energy that turned into ...


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In ionic compounds electron is transferred from one atom to another completely to form cation and anion, and resultantly, an ionic bond. To bring physics in this question, you have to understand that current is the flow of charge. All ions are charged. So positively charged ions move towards the negative electrode and anions move towards the positively ...


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There are never neutral atoms in pure $\ce{NaCl}$ or in its solutions. The pure $\ce{NaCl}$ crystal is made of piles of ions $\ce{Na^+}$ and $\ce{Cl-}$. When $\ce{NaCl}$ is dissolved into water, the ions $\ce{Na^+}$ and $\ce{Cl-}$ are separated. They become independent and can move in water. If you dip in this solution two conducting pieces bound to the ...


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