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Hydrogen and chlorine atoms of $\ce{HCl}$ in gaseous state are covalently bound and is termed hydrogen chloride. When this gas is bubbled into water, it ionizes completely to give $\ce{H3O+}$ (free proton + water molecule) and $\ce{Cl-}$ ions and becomes an acid solution which is termed hydrochloric acid. Even in gaseous $\ce{HCl}$, the charge is not ...


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No bond is completely ionic or completely covalent, Fajan's rule. Also $HCl$ is predominantly a covalent compound rather than ionic. Shouldn't, H+Cl- be a salt since hydrogen is positive and Cl is negative? Sure, $\ce{HCl}$ does dissociate into $\ce{H+}$ and $\ce{Cl-}$ in a polar solvent, but that doesn't mean $\ce{HCl}$ is simply $\ce{H+}$ and $\ce{Cl-}$. ...


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This question shows up a couple times in a google search, e.g. Source: https://faculty.uscupstate.edu/cbender/Web%20page%20folder%20enmass/CHM111L/NIE%20answers%20worksheet%20update%20Su2013.pdf or Source: https://www.fusd1.org/site/handlers/filedownload.ashx?moduleinstanceid=10419&dataid=21159&FileName=Net%20Ionic%20Equations%20worksheet.pdf ...


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There is no solvated molecule of either of 4 ionic compounds. All interactions ( or lack of ) happen on hydrated ionic level, including eventual precipitation or formation of ionic pairs. All four salts are soluble, including magnesium chromate with the solubility $\pu{137 g/100 mL}$ at $\pu{20^{\circ}C}$ (solubility table). When dissolved, salts form ...


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You can refer to the NIST Chemistry WebBook for thermodynamic data by species or reactions. I also found a database for lattice enthalpy here. For ionic radii, you can refer to this database.


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As described in the comments, there really is no sharp boundary between "ionic" and "covalent" bonding. With metal hydrides the situation is muddled further because the usual electronegativity-difference rules don't really work. Not only lithium but also magnesium forms a hydride whose ionic character far exceeds what would seem to be ...


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According to this reference Oxford Reference quoting A Dictionary of Chemistry here The bonding in lithium hydride is believed to be largely ionic; i.e. Li +H − as supported by the fact that hydrogen is released from the anode on electrolysis of the molten salt.


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