4

Coordinate bonds are covalent bonds where both bond electrons stem from only one of the two bond partners. They are formed when a Lewis base donates two electrons into accepting orbitals of the Lewis acid. That's not what you're looking at in this case, where both $\ce{P}$ and $\ce{O}$ contribute one electron to the common $\sigma$ bond. The interesting part ...


2

This should be a comment, but I decided to post it as an answer, since from my point of view, the present answers fail to shed light on the absolute simplicity of the truth. We can state from the present answers that there will be no precipitates, but not because the concentration is smaller than an atom per liter, we don't know the volume used since it was ...


2

I know there exist industrial methods for that already, but im poking around to see if maybe there's a way to do it under atmospheric pressure without tailored molecules like enzymes or metalorgnic complexes Though Haber process which was used to industrially produce ammonia was well-known, some researchers have also attempted to split nitrogen molecules ...


1

The article provided by Karl has answered the question with electroplating method, which is not preferred but this is the only answer I have. The method is based on MIL-P-18317. The electroplating solution consists of $\ce{Ni2SO4, Ni2(NH4)2SO4, ZnSO4}$ and $\ce{NaSCN}$ The black nickle coating are $\ce{NiS}$ and $\ce{ZnS}$. $\ce{NiS}$ and $\ce{ZnS}$ are ...


1

It is impossible to be definitive with such a simple picture. But, if we assume the colour code is black for carbon and that hydrogens have been omitted, the simplest answer is (to use a non-systematic name) tri-isopropyl methane. See this (very basic) description for systematic names.


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible