12

Quoting from here: In accord with general usage, the comma "," should be used to indicate continuous substitution, partial as well as complete, if there is no change of CN. Vacancies (symbol ") are treated here just like atoms. This usage is restricted to chemical formulas for atoms on a specific site. The comma is not appropriate for structure ...


9

A short “obligatory” reference from IUPAC Recommendations [1, p. 21], section IR-2.2.3.1 regarding use of parentheses in formulae: (d) In solid-state chemistry, to enclose symbols of atoms occupying the same type of site in a random fashion. The symbols themselves are separated by a comma, with no space. Example: K(Br,Cl) Related question ...


4

I assume liquid halogen to be bromine. From here: Glass, ceramic nickel or lead containers are suitable for bromine. Lead-lined steel tanks can be used. Only highly fluorinated plastics will resist corrosion. A free space of 8-10% by volume should be left in the container. Also see: https://patents.google.com/patent/US3375077


3

I have seen this nomenclature used as a shorthand to indicate a solid solution of two different ionic compounds that share a common anion. For example: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22011346 and: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0016703714004888 Since it's a solution of two different compounds, its composition can be variable.


3

There are many ways to synthesize copper selenide. It generally has two forms $\ce{Cu2Se}$ and $\ce{CuSe}$ but actually it is a non-stoichiometric compound. They are grown as nanoparticles for various applications like making semiconductor, optoelectronic components, sensors etc. By direct combination of copper and selenium vapour / direct displacement of ...


2

The ozone molecule is described with two resonant structures(as in figure) in which all the oxygen atoms respect the octet rule. The oxygen in the middle has a positive charge because has only 5 valence electron and the oxygen with the single bond has a negative charge because it has 7 valence electrons. In the real molecule both the bonds have the same ...


2

It's hard to pinpoint what the problem here is since I don't have the mentioned book to compare an answer with. The simplest way is write down half-reactions for reduction (red) and oxidation (ox) processes once you've assigned oxidation numbers (denoted above the symbols of the elements which are participating in a redox reaction), then balance the number ...


2

First of all, let me explain why your approach is a bit wrong... Addition of steps will only give you the net reaction, which is what you got. But in the process, the mechanism becomes blurred. For example, the net reaction which you have expressed, doesn't tell us the full story. One completely overlooks the fact the CO is also recombining to give CO2, and ...


1

TLDR: There is no exact generalized reaction. The reaction depends on type of interhalogen compound(value of n) and the nature of metal halides(ionic or covalent) $\ce{XX^{'}}$ form Let us take iodine monochloride($\ce{ICl}$). If it is reacted with ionic chloride like $\ce{KCl}$, it will form $\ce{ICl2-}$ ion. $$\ce{MCl + ICl -> M+ICl2-, (M=K, Rb)}$$ ...


1

We know now that bromine can be stored safely in glass (with appropriate glass handling, of course). Now for the "brown" part. Bromine can break down on exposure to ultraviolet light, a reaction shown here as part of an alkene bromination. Uncontrolled, this process could release reactive atoms; these may degrade surrounding materials and the products ...


1

The bond angle in $\ce{PH3}$ is about $92-93^\circ$, and by the percentage $s$ character formula i.e $\cos(\theta) = s/(s-1)$ you can calculate the $s$ character and that comes out to be 6%. And that where drago rule holds true , that is the orbitals involved in bonding are pure $p_x$ ,$p_y$, $p_z$ and as a character is high the lone pair is present in pure ...


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