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A picture, specifically from WP user Dnn87, beats a thousand words. The gray background is ideal for bringing out the true golden color of caesium metal. The color comes from plasma oscillations, in which electrons in a conducting medium spontaneously oscillate due to inherent instabilities. These may be traced to the electromagnetic interactions as ...


5

The picture you provided shows half the story. In the diagram above you can see that copper has a charge of +2 i.e. Cu$^{2+}$ which leads to a 3d$^9$ configuration. Since H$_2$O will here act as a weak field ligand, no pairing of electrons will be done in d-orbitals which will lead to sp$^3$d$^2$ hybridization.


2

$\ce{SO2}$ does react with $\ce{H2O}$ according to your second reaction (which is a half-equation) : $$\ce{SO2 + 2 H2O -> SO4^{2-} + 4 H+ + 2 e^- }$$ But $\ce{SO2}$ cannot react according to the first equation, which produces two non-combined (nascent) $\ce{H}$ atoms. Usually the electrons produced in this half-equation do not react with $\ce{H+}$ to ...


2

Due to two contradictory factors, one is the effective nuclear charge which is greater in $\mathrm{5d}$ making it of lesser energy and the second one is a nodal factor. Nodal factor depicts localization of electrons, which indicates of higher energy. Hence to balance these two effects out, for Ce the second electron goes to $\mathrm{4f}$ and its electronic ...


2

Hydrogen and chlorine atoms of $\ce{HCl}$ in gaseous state are covalently bound and is termed hydrogen chloride. When this gas is bubbled into water, it ionizes completely to give $\ce{H3O+}$ (free proton + water molecule) and $\ce{Cl-}$ ions and becomes an acid solution which is termed hydrochloric acid. Even in gaseous $\ce{HCl}$, the charge is not ...


2

Dissolution enthalpy is kind of scale balancing as being combination of lattice energy ( positive solid matrix breaking enthalpy) and hydration enthalpy(usually negative), following the formal process $$\ce{CaCl2(s) -> Ca^2+(g) + 2 Cl-(g) ->[H2O] Ca^2+(aq) + 2 Cl-(aq)}$$ The hydration enthalpy is very negative for anhydrous $\ce{CaCl2}$, but just ...


1

According to PubChem, the IUPAC name of nickel bis(glycinate) is carboxymethylazanide;nickel(2+), which has a given structure of: However, according to suggestions in Ref.1, the correct IUPAC name should be bis[glycinato(2-)-$\kappa^2$N,O]nickel. Since the complex is simply given as $\ce{[Ni(gly)2]}$, it is no need to go for the compllicated name since I ...


1

No bond is completely ionic or completely covalent, Fajan's rule. Also $HCl$ is predominantly a covalent compound rather than ionic. Shouldn't, H+Cl- be a salt since hydrogen is positive and Cl is negative? Sure, $\ce{HCl}$ does dissociate into $\ce{H+}$ and $\ce{Cl-}$ in a polar solvent, but that doesn't mean $\ce{HCl}$ is simply $\ce{H+}$ and $\ce{Cl-}$. ...


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