19

The name of the compound is 1-chloromethyl-4-fluoro-1,4-diazoniabicyclo[2.2.2]octane bis(tetrafluoroborate) (CAS #: 140681-55-6), which is commonly known as Selectfluor, a trademark of Air Products and Chemicals (see Waylander's comment elsewhere). Different view of the compound is given below (to you to understand the zig-zag feature): Introduced in 1992, ...


16

No, knowing the mass ratios is not sufficient by itself. In the absence of additional information (for example, molar mass) that would only be enough information to determine the empirical formula, which is the formula that contains the smallest integral ratios of atoms. (E.g., the empirical formula of $\ce{C2H6}$ would be $\ce{CH3}$.) There are (...


15

The molecule seen in the tattoo is a protein-based mammalian hormone called oxytocin, commonly called "the love hormone" because it is involved in several aspects of sexual reproduction. Image Source


15

There is an important concept to be understood underlying this question, something all new chemistry students eventually learn: all sensible chemical reactions will balance, but not all equations that balance make chemical sense. Balancing is purely mathematical manipulation (solving a system of linear equations), and proper balancing is necessary but not ...


14

The "permanence" is just a reference to it being waterproof. In general, the ink comprises a main carrier solvent, a glyceride, a pyrrolidone, a resin and a colorant. This is mostly the result of solubility. There are other markers sold on the market with labels such as "buff proof" (slang for removal proof), that are really just pens that use a ...


14

Gallium, and Galinstan have the ability to wet glass, while mercury does not. So it's most probably gallium (or Galinstan).


13

From [1, p. 828] (and many other organic chemistry textbooks), Oxone's formula is equally written as $\ce{KHSO5 * 0.5KHSO4 * 0.5K2SO4}$ or $\ce{2KHSO5 * KHSO4 * K2SO4}$, a potassium monopersulfate triple salt: Oxone® $(\ce{2KHSO5 * KHSO4 * K2SO4})$ A “triple salt”, providing a convenient source of potassium monoperoxysulfate (potassium hydrogen ...


12

TL;DR I think you might need two more things to interpret this line: the first code part of the standard, and the standard itself - ASTM D2000 (needs to be purchased). These descriptors are not chemical elements, they seem to be the part of ASTM D2000 "Standard Classification System for Rubber Products in Automotive Applications", so what you are looking at ...


12

That is generally known as Selectfluor, a source of electrophilic fluorine. The zig-zag line is a 2-D representation of the third ethylene $\ce{-CH2-CH_{2} -}$ unit that links the two nitrogens. more here and wikipedia


11

If you don't have any idea: Start with the hypothesis that your starting material is the salt of some metal. Some of the test are apparently useful to identify the cation, others tackle the anion. Is it likely that the flame-extinguishing gas comes from the cation? If it is not the cation, it must be the anion from which the gas is formed. Think in the main ...


10

Klaus's answer has all the right explanations but I always find these things hard to follow without pictures, so here are some to clarify. Note that in the pictures below we don't explicitly draw carbons or the hydrogens attached to them (we just mentally add enough hydrogens to make the number of bonds to each carbon equal 4). First what is benzopyran? ...


10

Pyrogallol is the common name for 1,2,3-trihydroxybenzene. Hydroxy groups are strong activavtors of aromatic systems. By the time 3 hydroxyl groups have been added to a benzene nucleus you have a very reactive molecule, reactive enough to react with oxygen in the air. The reaction is very complex and free radicals are thought to be involved. Free radical ...


10

Your analysis seems right and you remember correctly that colour change of litmus of litmus paper will indicate the pH value of the solutions into which it is dipped. That is, unless the dye (litmus) is irreversible transformed to another compound which no longer shows a pH dependent colour. As the experiment states: A piece of red litmus paper turns ...


10

$\ce{Fc}$ stands for ferrocenyl. So the first compound is an amide of ferrocenecarboxylic acid and tetramethylene diamine, and the second compound is p-ferrocenyl aniline.


10

The proposed strucutre of these compound are, correct me if i am wrong.


9

The particular reaction is of acetylene ($\ce{C2H2}$) and ethanol ($\ce{C2H5OH}$) to yield ethyl vinyl ether (IUPAC name ethoxyethene). It's one example of Reppe chemistry, a fairly diverse set of reactions, often operating on alkenes and alkynes (though certainly not exclusively). The specific reaction in the question is a vinylization reaction, though it ...


9

These are minerals that are naturally present in "tap" water. Chemically, they are most likely a mixture of calcium carbonate and magnesium carbonate, both of which are only very lightly soluble in water. As you boil away the water, these dissolved calcium/magnesium carbonates remain behind and their concentrations eventually become greater than their ...


9

I would guess that it is tin. The coloration and cut look right compared to an image of tin turnings (eBay listing for tin metal turnings). I'm more used to seeing aluminum and magnesium as strips rather than turnings. Beyond that, I think it will probably take more than just the image to positively identify the metal. You could test the material with ...


9

As orthocresol also mentioned, it's probably copper sulfate. As you said, the blue color essentially gives it away. (picture taken from Science Madness Wiki)


8

I realize this question is over two years old, but I have to add the correct answer here: the iron (II) sulfate you had at the beginning was in the heptahydrate form. SEVEN molecules of water for every iron (II) sulfate ion pair. Now, what do you think would happen to that crystal structure when you add one of the most powerful dehydrating agents in ...


8

This is liquid methane, which boils at a temperature of −161 °C. (Methane can be condensed in a cold trap that is cooled with liquid nitrogen.)


8

The structure represents adrenaline or 'epinephrine' (en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Epinephrine). As in: Go out and have an adrenaline rush on your birthday!! The image on wikipedia has a slightly rotated ring, so doesn't look identical.


8

According to an 1894 tract with the title Merck's Market Report and Pharmaceutical Journal: An Independent Monthly Magazine Devoted to the Professional and Commercial Interests of the Druggist, Volume 3, "cresol soap" was also called "crelium" or "crelium soap". The google n-gram viewer suggests that "cresol soap" is a historical term, whose usage began in ...


8

It's Copper Sulfate, more commonly known as root killer. It's also used in pools to kill algae. In the home, you flush it very slowly down your toilet drain to kill any tree or bush roots growing in the sewage pipes. It's fairly corrosive, so use it sparingly.


8

According to various sources Everitt's Salt has the formula $\ce{K2Fe[Fe(CN)6]}$, where both $\ce{Fe}$ are in the $+2$ Oxidation State. Everitt described it as a yellow precipitate, resulting from the reaction: $$\ce{2 K4Fe(CN)6(aq) + 6 H2SO4(aq) \to 6 HCN(g) + 6 KHSO4(aq) + K2Fe[Fe(CN)6](s)}$$ Acc. Everitt, the wet salt can be oxidised to Prussian Blue by ...


7

Sesquicarbide A quick Google search suggests that $\ce{Li4C3}$ is a real compound, but based on what I saw in the links, it probably is not ionic in the same way that lithium acetylide $\ce{Li2C2}$ is. $\ce{Mg2C3}$ appears to be the formula for magnesium carbide, or at least a magnesium carbide. A carbide is a binary compound of carbon and a less ...


7

Prediction software always has its limitations, and there is always a degree of error in the calculation. For the ChemDraw predictions, you will see that for the 3 aromatic environments, it has done 3 independent calculations, and has happened to arrive at the same chemical shift. This simply means that these shifts are coincident, not equivalent. Remember, ...


6

The most common glass-etching powders are solid ammonium bifluoride and solid potassium bifluoride. See for example the Material Safety Data Sheet for “EtchON Acid-Frost Glass Frosting Powder”, or this one. This is not a definite identification, but it fits your description, and those two are the most commonly available such chemicals. Disposal is a bit ...


6

Note that I can only comment on the English translations! Cyclohexanol is correct, cyclohexol is just wrong. This is not the only error in the abstract of the thesis. Cyclohexone is the most [...] isn't correct either. The name is cyclohexanone!


6

SciFinder is a product of Chemical Abstracts Service (CAS), which is a division of the American Chemical Society. Its registry contains information on more than 111 million organic and inorganic chemical substances, and is updated with 15,000 new substances daily. Additionally, it has more than 66 million protein and nucleic acid sequences.[1] The chemical ...


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