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There is one obvious $\alpha$-position, which is the tertiary carbon atom adjacent to the carbon carrying positive charge. This contributes one hypercongujation structure. It looks like there are no more apparent structures, but the methyl group that is para to the cation can also participate in hyperconjugation There are three $\ce{H}$-atoms on the methyl ...


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@ Martin has addressed the shortcomings of assessing “stability” by counting hyperconjugating C-H bonds. If by “more stable” one means which one of the two isomers, 1,2,3,4,5,8-hexahydronaphthalene 1 or cis-1,4,4a,5,8,8a-hexahydronaphthalene 2, has the lower heat of combustion, formation or hydrogenation, then a decision can be made. Unfortunately, there ...


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Disclaimer: This post might be hard to read for some people. Some may even consider this a rant. You have been warned. This answer will question the validity of the used models, as well as the basis for such exercises. (It will also point to a fundamental flaw of this specific exercise.) If you are a student, you might learn concepts that will later turn out ...


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Number of hyperconjugating structures for a pi-bond is the same as total number of alpha-hydrogen that are associated to it. We consider alpha-hydrogen individually for each double bond to calculate number of hyperconjugating structures. In the first compound, there would be 12 hyperconjugating structures. This is because alpha-hydrogen which are common to ...


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Consider the following assumptions to somehow force these substrates to proceed for $\ce{S_N1}$ reaction mechanism: Low temperature Polar protic solvent Low concentration of nucleophile w.r.t. reactant Now, in an $\ce{S_N1}$ reaction, the formation of carbocation is must. The primary factor that determines the reactivity of organic substrates in an $\ce{...


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