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The question is, in fact, a good one, but the concept of weaker/stronger is confused - and confusing! A way to describe the situation, using the terms in the question is this: strong acids and strong bases undergo complete hydrolysis in water. The energy gained from hydrogen bonding with a water molecule is great enough to effect complete ionization in ...


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Sodium carbonate indeed dissociates in water : $$\ce{Na2CO3 <=> 2 Na+ + CO3^2-}$$ But that is just beginning, as in solutions with carbonates, bicarbonates or dissolved carbon dioxide happen multiple chemical equilibriums: ( See a lot of info at Carbonic acid on Wikipedia): Carbonate anion partially hydrolyzes in water: $$\ce{CO3^2- + H+ <=> ...


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The reaction system can be described as: $\ce{H2O <=> H+ + OH-}$ $\ce{H+ + CO3^{2-} <=> HCO3-}, \mathrm{p}K_\mathrm{a2}=10.33$ Note, the net of the first two reactions imply a rise in pH in the presence of carbonate. Further, with time and carbon dioxide exposure: $\ce{H2O + CO2 <=> HCO3- + H+}$ $\ce{H2CO3 <=> H2O + CO2}$ And, ...


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No, it is not necessary to have excess water for reaction to occur. Yet usually what books and sources mean by hydrolysis means that water as a solvent reacts with the compound. As you may know without large excess of water you wouldn't be able to go very far with the reaction (Low Yield due to equilibrium). This is a reason why ester hydrolysis is also a ...


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