New answers tagged

-1

There is a quicker way to solve this equation, without any algebra. It is to imagine that, first $\ce{XeF_4}$ is hydrolyzed by $\ce{H_2O}$ forming $\ce{HF}$ and a hypothetical xenon oxide without any change of oxidation number. And secondly this hypothetical oxide $\ce{XeO_2}$gets disproportionized into $\ce{Xe}$ and $\ce{O_2}$, or into $\ce{Xe + XeO_3}$ $$\...


1

I think we are thinking too chemically, i.e., too basically. From my (limited) experience, soft soaps contain more water. The correspondence of viscosity or some other measure of strength or hardness with water content is not exactly identical for the sodium and potassium soaps, but it is fairly close. If you make a potassium soap with low water content, it ...


3

I don't know if anyone is still looking for the answer but here I go anyway because I spent 40 minutes researching this for an assignment TL;DR - The better solubility of potassium salts is the key factor, but not in the way one would initially suspect. Industrial processes and the efficiency of large-scale soap making explains the choice. The reason why ...


-3

Fluorine ion and chlorine ion are very corrosive in nature, so In water they easily form the hydrohaloacid as order of acidic strength in water is $hi>hbr>hcl>hf$ hence the stability order will be $F^{-} >Cl^{-} >Br^{-} >I^{-}$ which also shows stability of their acids.


2

If we consider $\ce{HX}$ as the common formula for hydrogen halogenides, then there is an equilibrium $$\ce{HX(aq) + H2O <=> X-(aq) + H3O+(aq)}$$ that can be expressed also as: $$\ce{acid1 + base2 <=> base1 + acid2}$$ The equilibrium is competition of 2 acids, $\ce{HX}$ ansd $\ce{H3O+}$. $\ce{H3O+}$ is the strongest acid stable in aquaeous ...


5

I'd say, yes it is possible. The pioneering work on interconversion reactions of cyclobutyl, cyclopropylcarbinyl, and allylcarbinyl derivatives has been done by John D. Roberts and coworkers (Ref.1). In these works, they have checked reactions under both $\mathrm{S_N1}$ and $\mathrm{S_N2}$ conditions. They have observed the reactions expected to involve ...


2

This information is wrong. Glycosides do undergo acidic hydrolysis. The accepted mechanism of this hydrolysis is as follows1: References: Vernon, C. A. “The Mechanisms of Hydrolysis of Glycosides and Their Revelance to Enzyme-Catalysed Reactions.” Proceedings of the Royal Society of London. Series B, Biological Sciences, vol. 167, no. 1009, 1967, pp. 389–...


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