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1

To extend the answer provided by @Junaid Jamil, you may borrow a concept used in small molecule crystallography. For an estimate, the volume of the individual molecule is approximated by the assumption that each atom with an atomic volume. These values are tabulated (see e.g., earlier answers provided here and here). Because density is the ratio of mass ...


4

Let's look at the system: clothes + grease + water + soap. To be more specific: a) We prefer to wear hydrophilic materials to manage moisture removal (sweat). The clothes could be cotton, wool or linen, which are naturally hydrophilic, or synthetic, like polyester or acrylic, which are naturally hydrophobic, but are treated with a finish to make them ...


0

Your "logic and reasonning" is entirely speculative and based on no knowledge of chemistry. Oleic acid and Linseed oil will not mix with straight chain hydrocarbons. Surfactants used in shampoos are highly hydrophilic and would not work in this instance. If there was a surfactant it would have to be a lipophilic one like the Triton™ X-100 that were ...


2

It is a matter of convention, which may evolve over time and context, including who you are communicate to. A strict application of the definition of «hydrocarbons» requires that there is at least one atom of carbon plus an other of hydrogen per molecule, and that any atom of the molecule is either of carbon, or hydrogen. However, hydrocarbons like methane (...


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Hydrocarbons(1) cannot be substituted at all, as they contain just carbon and hydrogen by definition. Hydrocarbons(2) as the base of substituent nomenclature can be formally as substituted as you wish. 1-chloropropane is not a hydrocarbon(1). Hypothetical hexaazabenzene is still hydrocarbon(2), even if there is no carbon nor hydrogen, all formally replaced ...


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