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The term "Essigäther" is actually the German name for ethyl acetate i.e Essig = "vinegar" + Äther = "ether". "vinegar" becomes acetic, hence ethyl acetate becomes "acetic ether". (etymoline.com) But, ethyl acetate is an ester. So, why is it named "acetic ether"? According to Leopold Gmelin, ester ...


6

Just to add another resource besides the excellent find by Nilay, in Organic Chemistry, The Name Game, it mentions ester from German Essigäther (acetic ether) an early name for ethyl acetate The unabridged Oxford English Dictionary (by subscription only) also mentions that Gmelin called these compounds as napthas but later he changed it to ester. H. Watts ...


5

After searching Google Books, I found autobiographical notes from Marie Curie. Apparently, it was radium chloride that was isolated first, not elemental radium. Salts can often be precipitated from solution at much lower temperatures than those needed to melt many inorganic materials, and you typically wouldn't need to shield a solution from air, so ampoules ...


2

Marie Curie's work was detailed in the French Journal L'Actualité chimique, $352$, p. V, May $2011$. It is called "Dossier Marie Curie" and was published just $100$ years after Marie Curie's Nobel Prize Conference in $1911$. She used beakers, Bunsen burners, filter paper and funnel. That is all. It could be summarized this way. Marie Curie ...


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tl;dr It's so simple it was likely never published as a "research result", since it stems quite directly from definitions. It's a small step from the conservation of matter and the definition of concentration. By definition: $C = \frac{n}{V}$, thus $n = CV$. If you dilute with pure solvent, you don't change the amount of solute that you have, in ...


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