New answers tagged

1

It is well known fact that branched-chain alkanes are more stable than the straight-chain alkanes with the same number of carbon atoms. That means branched-chain alkanes have higher values of enthalphy of formation ($\Delta H_f^\circ$) than that of straight-chain alkanes with the same number of carbon atoms. During the complete combustion reaction with ...


1

This question has already had some pretty good answers by user55119, James Gaidis and so on. However, since the bounty setter was looking for a definitive answer in pertinence with some tests, and I am quite well-versed with the particular exam he is interested in(i.e. the JEE), I would like to provide my final insights along with a summary of the concerned ...


3

Although I am conversant with this aspect of thermochemistry, it is not my area of expertise. Nonetheless, your question as to why branching leads to a lower heat of combustion in a set of alkane constitutional isomers is one that has intrigued me for sometime. So much so that, after asking former peers steeped in physical organic chemistry, they were at a ...


3

Branched-chain alkanes have lower values of ΔcH⊖ than straight-chain alkanes of the same number of carbon atoms, and so can be seen to be somewhat more stable. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alkane#Branched_alkanes The heats of formation are given in https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Standard_enthalpy_of_formation and go from -40.0 kcal/mol for a to -41.8 for b ...


3

In thermodynamics, the basis for a definition of temperature is provided by the $0^{\text{th}}$ Law: two bodies independently in thermal equilibrium with a third body are in thermal equilibrium with one another. Thermal equilibrium allows the definition of temperature: two bodies in thermal equilibrium are said to be at the same "temperature". The $0^{\...


7

Temperature is related to kinetic energy, but it can't be simply equated to the average kinetic energy of the system. As I wrote in response to another answer, different systems can have different average kinetic energies/particle, but the same temperature. E.g., at the same temperature the avg. kinetic/energy particle of a diatomic gas is greater than ...


-4

Temperature is the average kinetic energy of the particles making up a system. That's it, and it is correct. Any other definition, and there are many of this page, are either equivalent or incorrect. What's the problem?


11

Temperature vs kinetic energy [OP:] I've read at many places that temperature is the average kinetic energy of particles present in an object. Temperature has to do with the average kinetic energy of particles, but to say the two concepts are the same is incorrect. What is correct is that if the particles in two mono-atomic gas samples have the same ...


11

Heat is the transfer of energy to or from the body in forms other than matter flow or work (organized energy transfer, such as pushing). Temperature is only a well-defined property for a collective body (you wouldn't be able to tell me the temperature of a single atom, for example). Like you said, it's the property of matter describing the amount of kinetic ...


1

Welcome to the Chemistry Stack Exchange! In general, heat transferred to an ideal gas is not considered as work that was done on the system. I suspect you're referring to a process in which the internal energy doesn't change: $\Delta{U}=0$. As $\Delta{U} = q + w$ (where q is heat and w is work), in the case where $\Delta{U}=0$ you get $q=-w$. This holds for ...


0

I'm not actually a chemist:), but I teach chemistry at a homeschool co op and do have a science background academically. I think what you might be missing in your thought process is clarifying between heat conductivity and change in energy. I was a bit confused on this too. As others have mentioned, heat conductivity is not correlated to specific heat. When ...


Top 50 recent answers are included