12

Yes. Any fluid with a temperature is above critical temperature and the pressure above the critical pressure is by defintion a supercritical fluid. Don't be mislead by all the claims that supercritical fluids are special and wonky with all sorts of amazing, bizarre properties. This is true of some supercritical fluids near the critical point, but the ...


6

I give you a case. Suppose you opened an airtight jar containing an ideal gas. Suppose by some mysterious power, you are able to observe the molecules of the gas. What do you think you'll see on opening the jar? Obviously you'll see the molecules dissipating in space(the correct word would be diffusing). Initially they suppose on opening occupied 100ml, then ...


5

Poor carbon dioxide has been unnecessarily defamed as a greenhouse effect. This is not only gas in the atmosphere which is an infrared absorber. Guess what, water vapor is a major culprit as well along with methane (recall cows digestive system). Nature has a very delicate balance, carbon dioxide is plant's food as well. I recall some people doing PhDs on ...


5

Yes. But with several complications you don't normally use the gas laws to deal with The ideal gas law is useful in laboratory situations where you can control the various components in the law (volume, pressure, amount of gas, temperature). And it usually describes the equilibrium reached when those factors are held constant. In the situation you describe, ...


4

In case you're actually trying to design a serious scheme for extracting and storing carbon dioxide, you might want to start by reading the Wikipedia articles on carbon capture and storage and carbon sequestration. For the impatient, the summary is that it's simply not practical to store that much $\ce{CO2}$ in containers of any kind. Instead, you either: ...


3

Usage of ppm/ppb etc units is discouraged, as they are ambiguous without the explicit context. As generally, 1 ppm (w/w) <> 1 ppm (V/V) <> 1 ppm (n/n) <> 1 ppm (w/V). It is recommended to use explicit units, like e.g mg/L. Expecting ideal gas behaviour $pV = nRT$ is not reasonable. Ideal gases are not in equilibrium with their liquid phase. ...


3

Yes, they are related. The first comes directly from the conservation of number of moles of the solute in a dilution, $$n_1 = n_2 $$ Since $n = MV$, $$M_1 V_1 = M_2 V_2$$ The second is related to the conservation of the total number of moles in an isothermal compression or expansion, $$n_1 = n_2$$ Using the ideal gas law $n = pV/RT$, $$\frac{P_1 V_1}{...


2

For simplicity, let's assign numerical indices to the compounds of interest — all gaseous products participating in equilibrium: $$\ce{ZnO(s) + \underset{1}{CO(g)} <=> \underset{2}{Zn(g)} + \underset{3}{CO2(g)}}$$ Partial pressure of carbon monoxide can be found via its mole fraction $x_1$ and given total pressure $p$: $$p_1 = x_1p\tag{1}$$ To find ...


2

As in how much you could compress $\ce{CO2}$ would be the point when it gets converted to dry ice. Surely a solid would take even lesser space than liquid. As for liquid, you need to maintain a pressure of approx 5 atm at 31.1 °C to liquify $\ce{CO2}.$ If you want, you can have a look at the article World can ‘safely’ store billions of tonnes of CO2 ...


2

There are a number of ways to look at this. One is to look at the equations. Another is to plot the pressure p as a function of volume V. The area under the pressure curve on the plot is the total work done on the system. It is very easy to answer your second question by inspection of this figure, but perhaps not the first question without actually ...


1

Solve for the amount of gas in A: $n_A=p_AV_A/RT=\pu{0.727 mol}$. You'll need to perform necessary unit conversions or use R in units that match the given T, p and V units. Write the volume of chamber B in terms of knowns: $V_B=n_BRT/p_B=n_B \times\pu{4.13\times 10^3 m^3/mol}$. Write the total volume when mixed: $V_{tot}=n_{tot}RT/p_{tot}=n_{tot} \times\...


1

Some general comments on the current use of the VDW equation in both teaching and research (added as an answer at the OP's suggestion): The OP writes: "[VDW] is only still around for historical purposes, as it is largely inaccurate." That's not quite right—it's like concluding that, since the ideal gas law is inaccurate, it must only persist for historical ...


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