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9 votes

Shouldn't the Cl- be placed beside the charged N+ ion when writing the structural formula of Benzenediazonium chloride?

With respect to the point of your question, both ion placements are acceptable for the specified form of the salt's structural formula. From section GR-7.2 Positioning of components [1, p. 383] (...
andselisk's user avatar
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8 votes

Lewis Structure of OF+

A strategy different from the one described by Yusuf Hasan would be to look at the neutral isoelectronic molecule. The oxygen atom is isoelectronic to the fluorine cation, so $\ce{OF+}$ is ...
Karsten's user avatar
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7 votes
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Lewis Structure of OF+

A good way to think about stuff like this, is to imagine a possible synthesis for the given intermediate. One way of making this species would be to cleave the H-OF bond of HOF against it's ...
Yusuf Hasan's user avatar
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7 votes

Why exactly do we need formal charge?

Formal charge is considered to be the charge present in one atom by considering all the bonds to be 100% covalent. The "charge present in one atom" is not a clear concept. A better way is ...
Karsten's user avatar
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6 votes

Understanding the structure of NCS⁻

This is a misprint. Here is a similar problem (OpenStax Chemistry, retrieved from https://opentextbc.ca/chemistry/chapter/7-4-formal-charges-and-resonance/) that makes sense and has a correct answer: ...
Karsten's user avatar
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6 votes
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How to find the oxidation numbers of individual ions of a transition metal with an average fractional oxidation state

To accurately determine oxidation states in compounds, you need to have a good idea of what the actual underlying bonding model is like. Only in rare cases you can resort to shortcuts. One such ...
Jan's user avatar
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6 votes
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Can a neutral molecule have nonzero formal charge?

I feel there are some holes in my reasoning; how would I go about proving this? No matter whether you have filled shells or not, the sum of formal charges will always be equal to the charge of the ...
Karsten's user avatar
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5 votes
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What is the Lewis structure of the azide ion?

Your proposed structure is wrong. Nitrogen does not exceed the octet in any of its known compounds (and even if $\ce{NF5}$ will be discovered it will not exceed the octet according to everything we ...
Jan's user avatar
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5 votes
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Arrow pushing: why does the O become positive when its lone pair becomes a double bond?

Ah, the confusion that layman’s terms can cause. You are assuming sharing to mean ‘both have the same electrons as before, they just share a little bit of them’ — but that’s not really the nature of a ...
Jan's user avatar
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5 votes

Why exactly do we need formal charge?

Formal charge, like oxidation state, is fundamentally just a bookkeeping device (with a different counting method). This being so, formal charge can be correlated with an unequal sharing electrons ...
Oscar Lanzi's user avatar
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4 votes
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Formal charge and net charge

Net charge is the sum of all formal charges of the atoms in a molecule. Net charge is the charge of the molecule. Formal charge is the charge of an atom in a molecule. Formal charge varies when you ...
Another.Chemist's user avatar
4 votes

Difference between oxidation and formal charge

This is best explained in an example. Let’s take methyl isocyanide: $$\ce{\overset{-}{C}#\overset{+}{N}-CH3}$$ This structural formula already includes the formal charges. How do we arrive at these? ...
Jan's user avatar
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4 votes
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Formal charges on polyatomic ions

First off, in neither triiodide nor periodate have the structures you drew. They all assume octet expansion on iodine which has been disproven. It was traditionally explained by the ‘participation’ of ...
Jan's user avatar
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4 votes

How to calculate formal charge?

As Jan hinted in the comments, there are multiple electron bookkeeping methods which serve different uses. We want to keep track of electrons because it gives us an idea of what type of chemical ...
Ben Norris's user avatar
4 votes
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Computed partial charges for protonated amine: discrepencies between Gasteiger and other methods

tldr - atomic partial charges can be non-intuitive Formal charges in a Lewis structure don't always match up with partial charge assignment methods. Typically, one wants 'accurate' partial charge ...
Geoff Hutchison's user avatar
4 votes
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Proper notation of doubly charged ions

TL;DR: $\ce{He^2+}$ is the only preferred notation. Notations $\ce{He^{++}},$ $\ce{He^{+2}}$ or $\ce{He^{1+}}$ are obsolete and should be avoided. From IUPAC “Green Book” [1, p. 49], section 2.10.1 ...
andselisk's user avatar
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4 votes

Does formal charge affect bond polarity?

When you compute formal charges you split bonding electrons evenly between bonded atoms. This does not account for differences in electronegativity. It is similar to the difference between formal ...
Buck Thorn's user avatar
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4 votes
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What is the significance of charge balancing when analysing system speciation (carbonate system given as an example)?

(For a better personal understanding) What is the practical significance of including these charge balance equations? There are variables for concentration of $\ce{H+}$, $\ce{Na+}$, $\ce{CO2(CO2+...
Poutnik's user avatar
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3 votes
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Charge on an atom

It doesn't result in the generation of a positive charge on the nitrogen. It results in the generation of a formal charge on the nitrogen. The formal charge is defined as FC = V - N - B/2 with V ...
A. J. deLange's user avatar
3 votes

Why are electrons shared equally when calculating formal charge, but unequally when calculating oxidation state?

The oxidation state is a form to distribute the charge of atoms in molecules considering to have only ionic bonds. In contrast, the formal charge is the distribution of the electrons considering to ...
Verktaj's user avatar
  • 463
3 votes

Partial charges in a covalent bond

We describe an object, which does not exist, but is very real, called and 'orbital'. It is a region of space where an electron is 'likely' to be. It is the result of charge field interactions ...
Lighthart's user avatar
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3 votes

How to identify a coordinate bond?

The first thing needed for a dative bond is a lone electron pair in one atom and an empty orbital in another atom. This condition is necessary but enough. There is also a formula for the formal charge ...
Arman Monajemi's user avatar
3 votes

Cyanide's Lewis structure - electronegativity or octet rule?

Which rule takes precedence over the other? Using cyanide as an example, should I: Follow the octet rule and go with the first example? Follow the electronegativity rule and go with the second ...
Karsten's user avatar
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3 votes
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Is it possible for a carbon atom with a negative formal charge to have ONE bond and ONE lone pair?

The hydrogen atoms are not shown, so this is really $\ce{CH3CH2CH2CH2-}$ where the rightmost carbon atom has a lone pair and a formal negative charge. The species is the n-butyl anion:
DHMO's user avatar
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3 votes

How many sodium ions is each oxygen atom attracted to in aqueous sodium chloride?

When NaCl is dissolved in water, the sodium ions are surrounded by several water molecules which are all oriented with their oxygen atoms touching the sodium ion. But this number may fluctuate, as ...
Maurice's user avatar
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3 votes

Does a minus charge represent two electrons?

No, you are mistaken. Oxygen has 6 electrons (dots) on its outer shell in the Bohr model and two on the inner shell. The inner shell is, under lewis rules, irrelevant. So the outer shell, 6 out of 8, ...
Trish's user avatar
  • 189
3 votes

Is this analogy right?

The oxidation number is the charge that one atom would have if all the covalent bonds of the molecule (or of the ion) were transformed into ionic bonds, with a negative charge on the most ...
Maurice's user avatar
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3 votes

Is this analogy right?

Your analogy isn't correct. As @Ivan pointed out in the comments, oxidation numbers apply to covalent compounds as well as they do to ionic ones. You calculate oxidation numbers assuming that the more ...
Ray Bradbury's user avatar
3 votes
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Does formal charge or the octet rule take precedence over one another?

I believe the confusion stems from the false assumption that conventional Lewis structures are actually representative of the electronic structure of a molecule. They are not intended to be so. Rather,...
Andrew's user avatar
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