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To answer your question yes you can swap Petroleum ether for hexane. I think distillation would be the best option here since you dont have a rotary evaporator. If your desired molecule is well defined (boiling point is known) then you can separate it from the petroleum ether or hexane without much fuss. You should know that petroleum ether is not one entity ...


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Clean sample cells, ATR surfaces etc are imperative in spectrometry and a real problem. My ultimate solution was to buy my exclusive sets of cells and use only one of the set for sample and one for reference and not run an analysis until single beam and double beam matched archive spectra. NO ONE else ever touched these. Today with disposable cells, pipet ...


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You must first understand what happens when water is heated along the boiling curve. Start from the point $\pu{100°C}$and $\pu{1 atm}$. At this point there are two phases, one liquid whose density is nearly $\pu{1 g/cm^3}$ and exactly $\pu{0.96 g/cm3}$. And the vapor has a density of $\ce{0.0006 g/cm^3}$. If now you heat this system in a closed volume, the ...


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The essential condition is the compound thermal stability. If it decomposes below its melting point, it does not have a triple point. If it decomposes before properties of gaseous and liquid phases converge to each other, it has just estimated, extrapolated triple point. Beyond CP we talk about supercritical fluid, it kind of shares many properties of both ...


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$\mathrm{^1H \ NMR}$ spectra of pure ferrocene, acetylferrocene, and diacetylferrocene are very distinguishable: $\mathrm{^1H \ NMR}$ spectrum of ferrocene consists of only a singlet at $\approx \pu{4.2 ppm}$. $\mathrm{^1H \ NMR}$ spectrum of acetylferrocene consists of 4 signals: a triplet or multiplet around $\pu{4.8 ppm} \ \ce{(2H)},$ a triplet or ...


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Suppose $x$ and $y$ are the amount of $\ce{BaCl2}$ and $\ce{NaCl}$ in $\pu{mol}$, respectively in original mixture. Thus the mass of $\ce{BaCl2}$ in the mixture is $208.232x$ and that of $\ce{NaCl}$ is $58.4425y$, both in $\pu{g}$. Thus, $$208.232x + 58.4425y = 0.1036 \tag1$$ Now, the the amount of $\ce{Cl-}$ ions in original mixture is $2x+y$ in $\pu{mol}$. ...


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No, that's not how it all works on more than one level. First, the amount of $\ce{NH4+}$ out there is small. And by "small", I mean really, really small - about as small as you can imagine, only smaller. Many times smaller, I must reiterate. If some substance was to react with it (which is certainly not outside the realm of possible) and form a ...


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