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I think the term describing the initial process of separation of the solid phase (dust particles) from the gas phase via bubbling is a wet scrubbing process. On an industrial scale, it's more efficient to spray liquid phase, whereas on a laboratory scale bubbling in a compact glass gas scrubber or a gas washing bottle is more convenient. In order to ...


4

Mole itself doesn't have a magnitude, but the value of mole does, in fact it is the magnitude. Any measurement has a magnitude (ie for the mass of 5 kg the magnitude will also be 5). I think you are confusing it with scalar measurements (ie forces) which also have a direction. For example 5 Newtons 'in that direction'. Mole is similar to a dozen (just a ...


4

While I can't find specific justification for the surface, the first competition involved both gold and silver "racetracks." Drivers gear up for world’s first nanocar race How to build and race a fast nanocar The competition involves propulsion and imaging using STM so the substrate must be conductive. Gold (and silver to a lesser degree) is particularly ...


3

There are two separate effects we need to consider here: thermodynamic and kinetic. Let's assume you are only providing the energy thermally. So providing more energy means increasing the temperature (T). Thermodynamically, if a reaction is exothermic, and you increase T, the reaction becomes less favorable (assuming it stays exothermic over that ...


3

Wikipedia (primary reference) suggests a possible reason for $\ce{Fe2(CO)9}$ dissolving preferentially in THF versus nonpolar solvents: it reacts according to the scheme $\ce{Fe2(CO)9 + THF <=> Fe(CO)5 + Fe(CO)4 \cdot THF}$ Such a reaction is invoked to account for the dinuclear complex giving mononuclear products with various ligands in THF. A ...


1

It's not smoke, but Copper(II) oxide (cupric oxide, CuO), which is a black solid. It formed on the surface of your copper electrode and is falling off. Even after falling off, copper oxide could continue to form on the copper surface.


1

You know that in first approximation the absorption recorded is a product of the optical path length $d$, the extinction coefficient $\varepsilon$, and the analyte concentration $c$ as $$\mathrm{abs} = c \cdot \varepsilon \cdot d$$ Now, depending on your specific task, consider the three variables to your advantage. Because for the wavelength eventually ...


1

In addition to all the qualities @Karl stated (harmless, edible, overspray decomposes, etc.), such a coating would also need to stretch as the produce grows. Such a protective covering might even obviate the need for pesticides, if it were to be created. That said, there are edible wax and protein coatings to preserve produce after it's picked. ...


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