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2

Every material is terrible if not properly collected and processed after use. Wether you re-use it (like glass bottles), or recycle the material, or burn it to make electricity and district heating, is small potatoes. What material you use is also not very important, only the actual energy and environmental costs of "bio"materials like paper or cotton are ...


1

It makes no difference; but, if the food is wet and has salt or is acidic it will corrode through in a matter of hours (at ambient temperature, not if immediately frozen). The different appearance is because the final rolling is done with 2 layers of foil. One side of each sheet contacts the polished steel roller, the other side faces the second sheet of ...


0

Back when I was in my final year of high school, the subject of our major chemistry assignment was Aluminium. I remember the class being taken on a tour of an enormous aluminium factory, where we stood overlooking the massive rolls of aluminium and the successive stages it went through during production. I distinctly recall the foreman/guide telling us ...


20

Yes, you can use a common stove to test for cations. But a stove is designed to minimize the risk of incomplete combustion (which could lead to production of carbon monoxide), hence its flame always appears as an intense blue flame. Such color contamination could be problematic when testing for cations. In contrast, the combustion (and the color of the flame)...


0

Two good comments others made: Avoid pyrophorics Avoid open flames Work in a very well ventilated space (outdoors if necessary) I'd add the following: Use the smallest quantities necessary Use the lowest concentrations necessary Keep a fire extinguisher nearby if working with anything flammable Also, don't get too caught up in the NFPA labeling. The ...


1

I wouldn't be too worried about any chemicals that came from either of the products, or from reactions between the products. Any of those would have been volatile enough that they're long gone by now. From your description, it sounds like you may be having a reaction to either residual mold or another allergen present in the trailer. Mold is very difficult ...


1

Two different parts to the question I think: Are the readings you are getting on your meter meaningful? If formaldehyde levels are high, what (if anything) can/should you do about it? Regarding interpreting the reading from the meter, there are a few things you should consider right off: What does the manufacturer say about accuracy? Typically the results ...


0

As far as I know, the commercially available "Phenyle" which is used as a disinfectant or cleaning agent is a mixture of various coal tar derivatives. It has a strong odour similar to many polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons like benzene or naphthalene.


1

Regarding bed-bugs, they are notoriously difficult to remove - I'd highly advise getting a pro involved as soon as possible. For slow/steady carbon dioxide generation in a general sense, however, I'd go with yeast. East to find bakers yeast and flour in any supermarket. Google a basic bread recipe, and mix accordingly. If you do a slow rise, the dough will ...


5

You don't have to reinvent the wheel. Food industry already uses quite simple oxygen scavengers for decades, and one of the most affordable formulations include iron powder mixed with sodium chloride. Typically, an oxygen scavenger is packaged in small packets (sometimes labeled as "oxygen absorber" or "antioxidant") that are added with the product inside ...


1

The energy and speed do not affect particles themselves, but their interactions with other diatomic objects. And, of course, they affect their kinematics in electromagnetic field. Kinetic energy of a particle is $$E_\mathrm{k}=\frac 12 \cdot m \cdot v^2$$ The force on a charged particle in an electrostatic field of the strength $E$ is $$\vec F=q\...


1

The number of moles of solute does not decrease on dilution. For example suppose you add 2 moles of NaOH to 100cm3. Now if you dilute this solution to 1000cm3 you are still going to have 2 moles of NaOH. But now the total volume has changed ,hence the concentration also changes.


1

Sucrose is an covalent compound and it does not ionize. $\ce{KNO3}$, $\ce{NaOH}$ are good ionic compounds hence the can form electolytic solutions. Ammonium acetate also can ionize. Hence the answer is 2


4

What is this process called exactly? As far as I understand "deliquescence" is a property and not a process. Does the exchange of water between my pile of salt and the air have a specific terminology? Something that would go along with terms like evaporation, sublimation, condensation, etc.? Perhaps some mash-up of adsorption and dissolution? The ...


1

Calling gasoline "octane" would be mistake. There are a few widespread misconceptions about this topic. Most importantly, many people think that gasoline contains large amounts of octane, mainly because of the frequent mentioning of the high octane number of gasoline. Accordingly, many textbook chapters about combustion use the reaction of octane as example ...


1

Octane number is a scale that is used to determine the quality of a fuel. It may be defined the percentage of isooctane by volume in a mixture of isooctane and n heptane that has the same anti knocking properties as fuel under examination. Petroleum or crude oil is obtained in complex mixture of hydrocarbons (chiefly aliphatic with small amount of ...


1

The foaming action of soap was put there as a sort of "indicator" that something is happening. It's a marketing strategy because people are ignorant about how soap works. The bubbles are just air pockets and have no effect on cleanliness.


15

Foam is a side effect of using a tensio-active agents (though some tensio-active agents are engineered to produce as little foam as possible, e.g. in washing machines). In fact, you could consider that, if soap has nothing better to do, it will form foam. This answers some of your questions: foam does not (really) carry away dirt and its percentage of ...


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