14

The state of a compound, solid, liquid, or gaseous is a property which is unrelated to the property / strength of a Brønsted or Lewis acid of said compound. Thus, you can not infer from its physical appearance if an acid is safe enough to be touched by skin; it may be irritant / corrosive even in absence of water (e.g., p-TsOH as a solid acid, triflic acid ...


10

A concept that captures how effective a detergent is at doings its job is aptly called "detergency." As might be expected this is a complex property and difficult to describe unambiguously with a single parameter. Quoting Ref. 1 : Detergency is difficult to evaluate because it depends on a multitude of variables that in most cases are ...


7

Soapiness or anything like that cannot be represented by a single number. Hence no point in inventing such a quantity. Just like we cannot associate a plain number to odors, soapiness is scientifically meaningless because it will be an umbrella term. Just like the term polarity is misused, soapiness could be even worse. The only common property of ...


4

I think this is an optical phenomenon and no chemical reaction is taking place. When you are looking at a solution, you are basically perceiving its absorption spectrum. When you have a solid, you are looking at the reflectance spectrum and the story is more complex, if you have a heterogeneous solid like this stuff. If you originally had the solution and ...


3

Well. Solution of sodium alkylsulfonates are good detergents, because they produce calcium alkylsulfonates in hard water, and these calcium derivates are soluble in water. By contrast, usual soap produce calcium alkylcarboxylates (like oleate, palmitate, etc.) in hard water, and these compounds are not soluble in water. Soap may be a good detergent : it ...


1

You're not wrong. The reaction would still occur if the amounts are not in the specific ratio. The ratio must have been maintained so that they could ensure that almost all the reactant is used. Or if it would be possible to collect the water this formed, the number of moles of water would equal that of hydrogen used (and double of oxygen used). The ...


1

The washcloth suggested by Ed V could be dampened with plain water, or with solvent, for example, diluted isopropanol. The amount of dirt and grease you will be dealing with, in 95% of cases, IMHO, is something that can be wiped off, rather than requiring dissolution of the gob. If you have a gob of dirt/grease, remove most of it mechanically, then gently ...


1

The toxicity of cigarette is due to nicotine. Nicotine is not deeply modified by adding vinegar or baking soda. Such an addition changes nicotine into an ammonium derivate that suppresses its odor and smell, but it does not modify its toxicity. Nicotine and its ammonium derivate have the same toxicity.


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