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A chemical equilibrium concerns chemical reactions. There should be at least a forward- and backward reaction between two species but more complex systems (polygons, circles, …) with multiple individual reactions may occur. The important observation is that there is no macroscopic change to the chemical constituents of the system, i.e. the concentrations of ...


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Chemical equilibrium is a type of dynamic equilibrium, but not every dynamic equilibrium is a chemical equilibrium. In a chemical equilibrium there is no change on the macroscopic scale. That means that if you look at the system it seems like nothing is happening, but at molecular scale there are reactions going on and the rate of forward reaction = rate of ...


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I think what you are asking is this: Equilibria for chemical reactions typically* (see note at end) require specific ratios of products to reactants (as expressed by the equilibrium constant). By contrast, equilibria for phase transitions don't require specific ratios of products to reactants. [For instance, at the phase transition between ice and water, ...


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You must first calculate dilution factors. Assuming the volumes are additive, we can calculate dilution using $M_1V_1=M_2V_2$ equation. Also, assuming $\ce{Fe(NO3)3}$ and $\ce{KSCN}$ are each completely dissociated, we can say: $$\ce{[Fe(NO3)3] = [Fe^3+]} \text{ and } \ce{[KSCN] = [SCN-]}$$ Thus, initial $\ce{[Fe^3+]}$ and $\ce{[SCN-]}$ are $0.20$ and $\pu{...


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The second definition probably refers to the intensive properties of the phases, not the extent of the phases, being invariant, making the two definitions you present equal. The confusion within the first question you link to has to do with the definition of "boiling" and its application to open systems. Phase transitions of the sort being discussed here ...


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[OP] Why are melting and boiling considered equilibrium processes [...] They should not be considered equilibrium processes. If melting is defined as the process where there is a net change from solid to liquid phase, this is not an equilibrium. If boiling is defined as the process where liquid turns into vapor (rolling boil with bubbles forming below the ...


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Two different phases of a substance in contact with each other in a closed system at some uniform temperature and pressure (thermal and mechanical equilibrium) will be in equilibrium if the chemical potential of the substance is the same in both phases. It turns out that at its boiling point, a liquid has the same chemical potential as its vapor at that ...


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You should consider the Nernst equation $$ \Delta G = \Delta G^{\ominus} + RT\ln Q=- RT\ln Keq + RT\ln Q $$ At equilibrium deltaG is zero and Q the reaction coefficient is Keq also note $$ \Delta G = -nFE $$ so E is zero at equilibrium. Outside equilibrium Q will move towards K decreasing E.


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