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This is very poorly worded question, and really not just an equlibrium question. This is actually a solubility product question. Consider the given reaction: $$\ce{Fe^{2+} (aq) + S^{2-} (aq) <=> FeS (s)} \tag{1}$$ If equal volumes of $\pu{0.06 M}$ of $\ce{Fe^2+}$ and $\pu{0.2 M}$ of $\ce{S^2-}$ are mixed, since the equilibrium constant for the ...


3

Expanding on what Buck Thorn said in the comments and providing a more rigorous answer. The partial pressure would change as follows: $$\begin{array}{c|c|c|c} & \ce{SO2} & \ce{O2} & \ce{SO3} \\ \hline \text{Initial state} & P_A & P_B & P_C \\ \text{On halving volume} & 2P_A & 2P_B & 2P_c\\ \text{Final state} & 2P_A-2x ...


3

Consider this reaction: $$\ce{Fe^{2+} (aq) + S^{2-} (aq) <=> FeS (s)}\tag{1}$$ The equilibrium constant for the reaction is $1.6 \cdot 10^{17}$ at $\pu{298K}$. This is nothing but a weird statement of the $\mathrm{K}_\mathrm{sp}$ for FeS. Instead of concentrations let's use activities, $a$, for the species which is formally correct. $$\mathrm{K}...


2

In science, theories, hypothesis and particular mathematical models cannot be proven to be right. It is the principal limitation. They can be proven right only formally as mathematical construct, proving consistency. In relation to reality, there can be just confirmation or refutation of their agreement with experimental data. The Arrhenius equation is ...


2

Based on the discussion in comments, the OP is interested in the equilibrium concentration of the species ABC in this reaction scheme: $$\ce{A + B + C <=>[k_1][k_2] AB + C <=>[k_3][k_4] ABC}$$ Equilibrium is reached when the rates of the forward and backward reactions of each step are equal. Thus, we have have two equations describing the ...


2

When you mix the solutions, the iron that was in solution A is now diluted over both A and B. Same is true for the sulfide coming from B. With the A and B components being equal in volume you then have to divide your concentrations in half, thus $K=\dfrac{1}{(0.03-x)(0.1-x)}=\dfrac{1}{(y)(0.07+y)}$ where $y=0.03-x$ is the iron concentration you want. ...


1

The Van't Hoff equilibrium box is a chamber containing a mixture of reactants and products at equilibrium. It is connected to an array of cylinders, each containing one of the pure reactants or products. The chamber itself is operated at constant total pressure and temperature. The cylinders are each connected to the equilibrium box through a ...


1

Although it is not in any way a mathematical proof, a theoretical rationale for the general form of the empirical Arrhenius relationship is provided by transition state theory. The equation that results from transition state theory is $$k=\frac{\kappa k_BT}{h}e^{\frac{\Delta S^\ddagger}{R}}e^{\frac{-\Delta H^\ddagger}{RT}}$$ where the $^\ddagger$ symbol ...


1

I agree with Buck Thorn's explanation on $\ce{SO2}$ concentration in aqueous phase. Thus, when dissolve in water (or when is added to water), the initial reaction of $\ce{SO2}$ with water is shown in the following reaction (Ref.1): $$\ce{SO2 (g) + H2O (l) -> H2SO3 (aq)}$$ Then, formed $\ce{H2SO3}$ would stabilize following equilibrium: $$\ce{H2SO3 + ...


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