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Statement 1. Consider the reaction $\ce{A(g) + B(g) <-> C(g)}$ at equilibrium in a 1-L container with [A] = 2 M, [B] = 1 M, and [C] = 4 M. This statement is neither true nor false, I guess we will assume it as a given. It's worth noting that the reaction changes the number of moles of gas in the container. This is a hint that changes in pressure ...


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I propose this simple graphic answer as a complement to the more thorough replies above (comments welcome to confirm validity of my answer). Trace pH Vs % [HA] and [A-]. 0% means you only have the acid [HA] and 100% you only have [A-]. Addition of acid or base, to the buffer solution, affects the ratio [A-]/[AH] and consequently, pH. This has been explained ...


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The volume is assumed constant (1 L). It is not specified whether the reaction occurs in the gas phase, that is largely irrelevant, and neither pressure nor temperature information is provided, that is also not relevant to the problem. The equilibrium constant is a concentration equilibrium constant. The question does not require you to seek an algebraic ...


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The simple answer is that the phase diagram refers to pure water only—either in a single phase, or in some combination of phases. So let's imagine we have a large piston that contains only water—nothing else—that is maintained at a constant temperature of $\pu{20 ^{\circ}C = 293.15 K}$ And suppose it starts at a pressure of $\pu{1 \times 10^-6 GPa \approx 0....


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The statement of "But there is actually also a water vapor in equilibrium with liquid water" may have come from a confusion about the difference of a closed system of water and a beaker of water open to air, both under say NTP. When you talk about the state of water on the phase diagram, you are talking about the former case. As Buck answered above,...


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