6

The $\sqrt K/\sqrt C$ ratio is only an approximation. Let's do something more exact. (Why do I say "more exact" instead of "completely exact"? Read on, nature has a nasty curveball to in store for us!) Let $C$ be the nominal concentration of the acid, assumed monoprotic ($\ce{HA}$) for simplicity, and $K$ be its dissiciation constant. ...


2

In addition to Mithoron's and Poutnik's comments, the solubility product may not be relevant to your solution chemistry anyway. Solubility products enter into solution equilibria when the precipitates are present, as in this answer where relative solubility products predict whether mostly magnesium or mostly iron will be dissolved in water when their ...


1

The problem is that both titration curves are wrong: at the first equivalence points, the pH does not equal $\mathrm{p}K_\mathrm{a1}$ and the pOH does not equal $\mathrm{p}K_\mathrm{b1}$. As well, the two provided dissociation constants for carbonate ion, in the OP's upper figure, are also wrong. The figure below shows two titration curves: 1) for 10 mL of 0....


1

This is where your logic fails: since the concentration of reactants and products remains the same since B is different from A As soon as you mix two components you change the concentration of both, you effectively dilute all components. Otherwise your intuition is correct. The gases can often be assumed to act independently. This is true if the solution ...


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