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19 votes
Accepted

Does all fire only emit light on its outermost shell?

The answer is NO. The article you quote makes a completely unwarranted generalisation that "all flames are hollow". This is true of some flames but only because the fuel that is burning is ...
matt_black's user avatar
  • 36.8k
7 votes

Absorption and emission at same wavelength?

Yes it is very common particularly in the more rigid type of molecule. The best example is chlorophyll and this overlap of absorption and emission leads to energy transfer in photosynthesis. The ...
porphyrin's user avatar
  • 30.6k
5 votes

How to Combine an Emission spectrum into a colour?

It is not simple -- for example, to many people, red + blue spectral lines appear purple/violet, i.e., shorter wavelength than pure blue! Though you could assign a color name to a pure spectral line, ...
DrMoishe Pippik's user avatar
5 votes

Detectable elements using flame AES

but I can't find anything because flame AES seems to be quite outdated. Please don't say that you cannot find anything, this is the reason (i) why physical libraries still exist and (ii) right key ...
AChem's user avatar
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3 votes
Accepted

Photodissociated iodine laser and population inversion

You are making a chemical laser. A laser depend on keeping a positive difference in population between the two levels involved (upper >lower), and of course feedback for a laser oscillator. It does ...
porphyrin's user avatar
  • 30.6k
3 votes

How to Combine an Emission spectrum into a colour?

In other words, how does the eye combine the mess of an emission spectrum into a single colour? Although your query is related to vision and others have addressed it, let me clarify a couple of ...
AChem's user avatar
  • 40.9k
3 votes

How to Combine an Emission spectrum into a colour?

As I understand your issue, you need to convert spectra into RGB triplets. Quantitative colorimetry theory addressing that issue is quite thoroughly stated in this wikipedia article on CIE 1931 color ...
Nicolas Peron's user avatar
2 votes
Accepted

Is vibronically resolved spontaneous emission temperature dependent, following a distribution defined by the canonical density operator?

In solution generally yes, measurements show that vibrational relaxation takes less than 5-10 ps and excited state lifetimes are usually longer than this so a thermal population exists after this time....
porphyrin's user avatar
  • 30.6k
2 votes

Where do electrons jump to when they jump to next shell in emission spectrum? Why are there no emission lines for jumps btwn orbitals, same shell?

Yes there are emission lines for jumps between the orbitals for multi electron lines as seen in the form of doublets( two closely spaced lines) and triplets( three closely spaced lines). Infact this ...
Acc2's user avatar
  • 195
1 vote

Thermionic Emission Conservation of Energy

I was mistaken on the principle that governs vacuum tubes. It is not that the signal is being amplified by thermionic emission; rather, the radio wave is being used as a gate to allow or block ...
Malcolm McClintock's user avatar

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