Skip to main content
4 votes
Accepted

Substitution or elimination when a chloroalkene reacts with NaOH in ethanol?

This is an example of the subtle difference between different bases that are strong in water but may not be equally strong in other, less polar solvents. Alcoholic potassium hydroxide certainly does ...
Oscar Lanzi's user avatar
  • 58.6k
2 votes

Difference in reactivity of sodium ethoxide and NaOH in ethanol

NaOH dissolved in ethanol gives a mix of hydroxide and ethoxide depending on how much water is present. To run a reaction with a pure alkoxide the procedure is to dry the alcohol and to generate the ...
jimchmst's user avatar
  • 2,179
2 votes
Accepted

Mechanism for elimination in 3-Chloro-1,4-cyclohexadiene

Yes the mechanism is correct. When ever a nucleophile is already present in a compound then its is favourable that intramolecular attack would occur as they are faster than intermolecular attack. In ...
WIZARD GAMER's user avatar
2 votes

Mechanism for elimination in 3-Chloro-1,4-cyclohexadiene

I would assume that the molecule is deprotonated and then loses the chloride ion to give the aromatic product. Either caroon atom 3 (with the chlorine) or carbon atom 6 (with only a pair of hydrogens ...
Oscar Lanzi's user avatar
  • 58.6k
1 vote

Leaving group ability vs Stability of Transition state for determining rate of E2 elimination reaction

The transition state you are comparing isn't the actual transition state. They are the original molecules themselves. The 'stability of transition state' you are referring to is used to decide the ...
JackSparrow's user avatar
1 vote

Why does alpha-carbon substituents increase the rate of E2 reactions?

You are on to something. Check out the product ratios here: https://chem.libretexts.org/Bookshelves/Organic_Chemistry/Supplemental_Modules_(Organic_Chemistry)/Alkyl_Halides/Properties_of_Alkyl_Halides/...
jimchmst's user avatar
  • 2,179

Only top scored, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible