4 votes

What would be the product(s) when 2-iodobutane is heated with tertiary butoxide?

As described in most introductory organic chemistry textbooks (my usual reference is Loudon), E2 elimination to form an alkene typically produces the more substituted alkene as the major product. This ...
user avatar
  • 9,107
3 votes
Accepted

Conversion of cyclohepta-1,3-diene to cyclohepta-1,3,5-triene

Thanks to @Mithoron, @Waylander and @M.L for your insightful comments! Willstatter's synthesis is described in greater detail on synarchive, as shared by M.L. Indeed, as Mithoron pointed out, 1,4-...
user avatar
2 votes
Accepted

Mechanism of acid-catalyzed ring opening of a cyclopropane ring

I believe the mechanism should be somewhat like this (after the formation of carbocation) - It would account for the product shown, but I am not sure if it's correct. I feel it's more favourable for ...
user avatar
  • 1,771
2 votes

Does E1 mechanism always imply first order reaction?

I think the problem lies in definition of terminologies. There are various kinds of reaction which occur in multiple steps, but just because one of the elementary step reaction follows SN1 or E1, it ...
user avatar
  • 324
1 vote
Accepted

Why will a lone pair from H2O not attack a C+ atom in elimination reaction?

If $\ce{H2O}$ attacks the $\ce{C+}$ atom, it will produce the original alcohol back. No chemical effect.
user avatar
  • 21.8k
1 vote

Reactivity of 1-bromo-4-tert-butylcyclohexane isomers with methanol

You are right on the part of E2, 2 will react slower. The reactivity of SN1 follows the same order - the carbocations are same but in 1 due to $\ce{Br}$ being on the axial position, the $\ce{C-Br}$ ...
user avatar
1 vote

Why is the major product of an elimination reaction an alkyne and not the diene?

The concept here is that after the formation of the alkene (propene, in this case), it is much more easier to abstract the vinylic hydrogen as compared to the allylic hydrogen and thus preferring the ...
user avatar
1 vote

When does reaction of alcohol with alumina give an ether and when an alkene?

According to Paul Sabatier in "Catalysis in Organic Chemistry", With ethyl alcohol [on alumina], ether is formed above 240° and at 290° pure ethylene is evolved regularly, this evolution ...
user avatar
1 vote

Temperature required for E1 elimination reaction

This is a question that is answered by careful experimentation [Possibly the experiment has been done already]. Primary and secondary require high T to dehydrate usually about 150-200C, intermediate ...
user avatar
  • 968

Only top scored, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible