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"Estrontium" is not used as an element name in any language. It appears that the error traces to a single user by the name of Alejo Miranda (listed as from Ecuador) who has posted a large collection of periodic tables and individual element clip art to shuttersock, iphoto, etc. in which "estrontium" is incorrectly used as the English name for strontium. The ...


12

Is carbon the only element that can do this? No, carbon is not the only element with such characteristics. If not, then what are the other elements can also do this? There is a whole number of elements such as silicon, arsenic, germanium. Is there a term to describe such elements? At least I'm unaware of such a term, which might be furnished by our ...


9

As it has already been mentioned, these are mass percentages, which are a bit imprecise. For the reference, CRC handbook of chemistry and physics [1, p. 14-17] lists elements' abundances in seawater near the surface in $\pu{mg L-1}$, alphabetically. I took 15 (starting with 16th element $\omega < 10^{-4}~\%$) most abundant elements from that array and ...


9

The book that you're reading is measuring by mass. If you have pure water then you would expect oxygen to make up $\frac{16}{16 + 2}\times 100\% \approx 89 \% $ by mass. Likewise, hydrogen would make up $\frac{2}{16 + 2}\times 100\% \approx 11 \% $ by mass.


6

Since there were no further suggestions, I decided to use the references from my comment in an answer, which, I believe, is element 99, einsteinium. Both single crystal x-ray diffraction (SCXRD) and powder x-ray diffraction (PXRD) have certain sample requirements/limitations: Mass/amount PXRD: lower limit is in micrograms region, ideally at least a couple ...


5

No, carbon is not the most common element of the human body. The human body is mostly water, so the most common element is bound to be hydrogen or oxygen. Which one wins depends on the rules of your game. If you are counting atoms in all those $\ce{H2O}$ molecules, you choose hydrogen. If you go by mass instead, oxygen is the most common element in our ...


4

For your interest, I quote a paragraph from a book "Handbook of Nanophysics: Nanoparticles and Quantum Dots" by Klaus D. Sattler (Ed.). Section 12-8. I don't think people know the reason as to why Ga likes to exist as a dimer (as you know $\ce{S}$ is $\ce{S8}$ and so on). The cohesive energy of the elemental solids is defined as the difference between ...


4

The dilithium dimer exists- but it isn’t particularly common, and we usually only see it in the gas phase. Essentially, the 2s electrons interact and form a bonding orbital. (s-p mixing is particularly pronounced here, but I presume you don’t know MO Theory.) Due to the diffuse nature of lithium’s atomic orbitals, the bonding is pretty weak (Wikipedia ...


3

The answer to your question is no, there is no element with no liquid state. The state of an element (or molecule) depends on the temperature and the pressure. All elements can be in any of the three states (solid, liquid or gas) with the right temperature and pressure. We say that oxygen is a gas because at standard temperature and pressure it is in gas ...


3

Instead of your definition, which can be misleading if you are a beginner, I would use the Wikipedia definition instead. You see that an element is better defined using the atomic number, i.e. the number of protons in the nucleus: we define elements as those entities which have the same number of protons in the nucleus. That's why we can distinguish between ...


3

La and Ac have $d^1$ electrons in their valence shells, rather than $f^1$ electrons. The long table you found looks like that for a several reasons. The trends going down Sc-Y-La are like those seen in groups 1 and 2. The trend going down Sc-Y-Lu is like that of groups 4 to about 10. Since lanthanide chemistry is basically that of trivalent alkali or ...


2

Tl, dr: Upon further review the differences between beryllium, magnesium and other metals is not so clear-cut. There is less to the difference in flame colors than meets the eye. We do not have polar opposites of colored flames at one end and white flames at the other. Potassium does not introduce a strong color to the flame even though we often call the ...


2

Whether a "metalloid" is both brittle and a good conductor depends on what you mean by "metalloid", which varies in literature, what is a "good" level of (electrical) conductivity, and even what exactly you mean by "brittle" versus "ductile". Silicon, for instance, is only a semiconductor, with much less electrical conductivity than metals, when pure. ...


1

You could say that the period number tells you about the largest value of principal quantum number in which a electron is present. Electrons are filled according to $n+l$ rule. It states as $n+l$ increases, the energy of the orbital increases. If $n+l$ is the same, then the bigger $n$ has larger energy. So $\mathrm{4s}$ would be filled before $\mathrm{3d}$....


1

Gold has only one natural isotope: 197. There are artificial gold isotopes, but they do not end up in gold bars. Even if they did, their half life is measured in days so don’t expect much to remain after a year or so. The “structure” of the metal bar, or atomic arrangement, has nothing to do with its isotopic composition. Even if you were to measure ...


1

No, carbon is not the only one that can bond to itself. It's a unique property of some elements mainly the group 14 elements like silicon, germanium, arsenic etc. This phenomenon is called catenation. It might be mainly due to presence of four valence electrons in their outermost shell. A large number of carbon atoms are linked with each other with sigma and ...


1

$n_1 = 4 - l_1$ means the same as $n_1 + l_1 = 4$, so the $n$ and $l$ quantum numbers of the first electron added up should equal 4. This could refer to 3p or 4s. For the second electron removed, the $n$ and $l$ add up to 5. This could refer to 3d, 4p or 5s. For chromium, the first electron removed is the 4s, followed by the 3d. For copper, this is the ...


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