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You can make a quick estimate yourself based on observable bulk physical properties: According to “Aqueous Solubility of Inorganic Compounds at Various Temperatures”, in CRC Handbook of Chemistry and Physics, 97th Edition (2016), William M. Haynes, ed., CRC Press/Taylor and Francis, Boca Raton, FL., the solubility of $\ce{NaCl}$ at $20\ \mathrm{^\circ C}$ ...


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When NaCl is dissolved in water, the sodium ions are surrounded by several water molecules which are all oriented with their oxygen atoms touching the sodium ion. But this number may fluctuate, as these water molecules are not chemically attached by covalent bonds and they are often bumped and even ejected by other water molecules due to the Brownian ...


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Well, I would say that the strength of the covalent bond is related to the level of polarisation abilities of the molecule in addition to the point stated by peaceHoper . In an ionic compound , polarisation is defined by the distortion of the anion by the cation . The more the polarisation , the more the covalent characteristics of the molecule . And thus , ...


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Strength of covalent bond depends on many factors, one of the key factors is "extent of overlapping of orbitals". For e.g., if you consider $\ce{H2}$ molecule, there is a head on overlapping of $\mathrm{1s-1s}$ orbitals involving two hydrogen atoms, but in the case of, say, $\ce{HCl}$, there is a head on overlapping of $\mathrm{1s-3p_z}$ orbital ($\mathrm{1s}...


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One possibility is the formation of an intra-"molecular" hydrogen bond between the peroxy-bonded hydrogen and a third oxygen atom. The structure shown in Wikipedia for the acid suggests this interaction. The involved hydrogen is curled up into the five-membered ring formed by such a hydrogen bond, while the other hydrogen atom is freely exposed and ready ...


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