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29 votes

Microwaving a glass of water, what happens?

Heating water on a hot plate is safe, because the hottest point is at the bottom of the pot. A lot of relatively small bubbles appear there without much overheating of the water, because there is a ...
Karl's user avatar
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15 votes

Microwaving a glass of water, what happens?

The mode of heating of a water glass in a microwave and on a stove is actually very similar. While it's true that microwave radiation penetrates somewhat into the body of water, the penetration depth ...
Luaan's user avatar
  • 625
15 votes
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Can reactions produce microwave or radio wave radiation?

An ammonia maser qualifies as an inorganic RF-emitting reaction. As the nitrogen changes position in the $\ce{NH3}$ molecule, ~24 GHz radiation is emitted. Similarly, organic methanol, $\ce{CH3OH}$ ...
DrMoishe Pippik's user avatar
11 votes

Is it safe to look at a mercury gas discharge tube?

Could it have caused irritation or injury? Possibly, but not likely, depending on a few factors: The intensity of the emitted ultraviolet. Proximity to the light source. Length of exposure. You'd ...
DrMoishe Pippik's user avatar
10 votes
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What chemical properties that allow for colour exist in the dark?

The chemical property that creates colour is the ability to absorb light of a specific visible wavelength. There is more than one way to do this. Mostly colour is caused by the existence of ...
matt_black's user avatar
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9 votes
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Can visible light or infrared radiation excite electrons?

Different regions of the electromagnetic spectrum correspond to different atomic and molecular processes, each with one or more associated spectroscopies. Here is a general summary, with decreasing ...
pentavalentcarbon's user avatar
9 votes
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A question regarding excitation of electrons in atomic orbital

The OP asked Is the dexcitation and remission of photon a phenomenon which can only be seen when an electron goes from one shell to another like from n=1 to n=2 or can it also be seen when electron ...
Ed V's user avatar
  • 5,060
8 votes

Microwaving a glass of water, what happens?

A microwaved glass of water will 'bump' if the glassware is clean and the microwave heating is uniform. The water has some tensile strength, so a bubble will not form at the exact boiling ...
Whit3rd's user avatar
  • 468
8 votes
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Can gas be made to block radiation better?

Your question seems to be about the ozone layer, but shows some misunderstanding. First, ozone, $\ce{O3}$, absorbs some "radiation", specifically electromagnetic radiation, e.g. visible light or ...
DrMoishe Pippik's user avatar
8 votes

When light shines on a material, how much of the light interacts with the electrons and the nucleus?

Consider that at visual frequencies, The wavelength of light is, very roughly, three orders of magnitude larger than atoms. The energy in visible light, very roughly, one eV, is about three orders of ...
DrMoishe Pippik's user avatar
6 votes
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Can gamma radiation cause transmutation?

Answer to a More General Form of Your Question The answer to the question Can gamma radiation make non-radioactive stuff radioactive? is yes, but only if the gamma ray has enough energy. "...
Arcuritech's user avatar
6 votes

Can gamma radiation cause transmutation?

Yes. See Photo-Fission in Heavy Elements (1947) Phys. Rev. 71, pages 3-10 : fission should be possible for all heavy nuclei which lie well beyond the minimum of the packing fraction curve, ...
DavePhD's user avatar
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6 votes
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What is the quantum mechanical explanation of X-ray diffraction?

The description given in your question pretty much explains things. I would put it in slightly different words which may or may not help, which is that the x-ray photon induces a dipole moment in the ...
porphyrin's user avatar
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6 votes
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Why can UV light initiate a reaction between hydrogen and chlorine gas?

Before going into the mechanism of this reaction, I suggest you look up free radical mechanism, as this reaction takes place through that. $\ce{Cl-Cl}$ bond in $\ce{Cl2}$ is weak enough to be broken ...
CupC_56's user avatar
  • 462
6 votes
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De-excitation of a molecule

After radiation is absorbed and the electron is at an excited state in the molecule there are several pathways for de-excitation to occur (see fig.). The pathway of choice depends on its rate, ie how ...
Outlander's user avatar
  • 1,603
6 votes

Why hot iron turns from red to white and then blue?

White is not a color. It is the signal sent by the eye to the brain when the light contains the same proportion of red, orange, yellow, green, blue and violet as in the sun light. If the light ...
Maurice's user avatar
  • 28.6k
5 votes

Stability of Bohr Orbits

Not every model is perfect. Rutherford's model suffered from the problem of electromagnetic radiation but answered important questions about the structure of atoms by showing the existence of a ...
bon's user avatar
  • 15.4k
5 votes

What is the quantum mechanical explanation of X-ray diffraction?

Explaining the diffraction of a photon off of a crystal lattice quantum mechanically is the same as finding what momenta can be transferred to the photon by the crystal lattice. The simplest way to ...
jheindel's user avatar
  • 13.1k
5 votes

In spectroscopy, is it possible for the sample to be excited multiple times?

From memory something like this has been used as a basis for isotope separation using intense $\ce{CO2}$ lasers to fragment molecules. A process of 'ladder climbing' takes place aided by the fact that ...
porphyrin's user avatar
  • 30.6k
5 votes

Will gamma radiation cause "thermal" decomposition of sodium bicarbonate?

I think you are looking in the wrong direction. If you subject oxoanions such as sulfate or nitrate to intense gamma ray fields then you will see decomposition of the anions to form oxygen and ...
Nuclear Chemist's user avatar
5 votes

Can we make chemical bonds using light, instead of breaking them?

Surely, if light can break bonds, it can make bonds as well. We find some simple examples in high school textbooks as well, such as the chlorination of olefin compounds under the presence of UV light. ...
ananta's user avatar
  • 2,307
5 votes

Can we make chemical bonds using light, instead of breaking them?

Is it possible to use a specific wavelength to get the atoms to bond again? Not directly. The crucial step in photochemistry is the absorption of a photon. Usually, this results in a molecule in an ...
Karsten's user avatar
  • 40.6k
5 votes
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How does carbon dioxide in the atmosphere keep heat trapped?

$\ce{CO2}$, like all other matter, can only absorb photons of energies corresponding to some kind of quantum transition with a high transition probability, whether that is a rotational, vibrational, ...
Hayden S's user avatar
  • 736
4 votes

Why does a mixture of siloxene and cerium(IV) sulfate luminesce?

According to this paper: "Siloxene is a yellow silicate polymer obtained from the reaction of calcium silicide with hydrochloric acid." Also, from the same paper: "The basic structure [of ...
airhuff's user avatar
  • 17.5k
4 votes

Why does a mixture of siloxene and cerium(IV) sulfate luminesce?

The idea of chemiluminescence is pretty simple, you need an oxidizer and a substance that actually gives a glow. According to Wikipedia cerium sulfate is rather an oxidizer especially under acidic ...
phenolicdeath's user avatar
4 votes

Are there non-transparent gases?

The answer to your question is yes, there are non-transparent gases, however, it depends upon the wavelength at which you are observing and how much gas you are looking through. At some wavelengths ...
porphyrin's user avatar
  • 30.6k
4 votes
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Substances that pass visible light but absorb microwaves

Sure - ethanol and methanol (among others) are listed here as being "high absorbers" of microwave energy.
Todd Minehardt's user avatar
4 votes
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Radiofrequency transmitter in an NMR experiment: Is there an involvement of (electromagnetic) radio wave?

I finally asked an NMR spectroscopist who was the editor of the Journal of Magnetic Resonance and knows the inside out of NMR spectrometers. He sent a scanned copy of Hoult's paper from 1989. The ...
AChem's user avatar
  • 40.8k
4 votes

When light shines on a material, how much of the light interacts with the electrons and the nucleus?

When light shines on a solid surface, what % of light hits the electrons and what % hits the nucleus? If we replace "hit" with "scatter from or become absorbed by" and restrict ...
uhoh's user avatar
  • 5,812
3 votes
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What is the reason why protons and electrons do not collide?

They do collide. But it's not like cars crashing and smashing each other up on the highway. Their quantum mechanical wavefunctions overlap and the electrons do in face settle in with wavefunctions ...
Oscar Lanzi's user avatar
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