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You can't control both voltage and current electrically: Your power supply will hold one or the other constant, but the properties of the electrolytic cell will then determine the other one. So you need to hold all of the chemical parts of the experiment constant: Have a large ion bath so that the concentration doesn't change much as the plating takes ...


4

Try to change the geometry of your electrodes. For example, increase or decrease the distance between the electrodes. This will modify the internal resistance of the solution. So if you have a generator producing a constant voltage, you may reach the desired currant, simply by changing the distance between the electrodes. Of course the electrodes must be ...


2

You could create a constant-current source instead of using an off-the-shelf power supply. There are also off-the-shelf constant-current supplies, so ask your lab manager if that's a resource. An EE colleague can set this up for you if it's too far outside your domain. Here are a few articles as starting points. Total cost should be < $15. http://www....


1

For an electrochemical reaction, you count the atoms / ions by mol, and use the coulomb as a counting unit of charge. For a more intuitive explaination of the $n$ factor in the Faraday equation, try this analogy: The summer olympics include swimming in a pool with lanes $50\,\pu{m}$ long. Among the typical competitions are runs about $50$, and $100\,\pu{m}$...


1

Suppose you have two galvanic cells A and B producing 1.14 V. If you connect them together, with both positive poles together, and both negative poles together, nothing will happen. No current will be produced. Now suppose that one of these two cells, say A, produces the same voltage 1.14 V, and B produces a little less than A, say 1.10 V. A works in a ...


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