5

Who was responsible for this naming system and how can we change it? Michael Faraday was responsible for the terms anode and cathode more than hundred years ago. All the confusion regarding the nomenclature will vanish if you do not associate electrostatic signs with these two terms. One should identify the electrode labels with the redox processes rather ...


3

I am sorry, this is not an answer but a comment, too long too be edited in the comments section. I don't agree with "straightforward" in the sentence : " It is relatively straightforward to understand that the more the diffusion layer grows, the shallower the concentration gradient gets and therefore that the current decreases. " This would be an ...


3

The answer is: it depends. Dissolution of a salt implies that the entropy gained exceeds the cost of breaking lattice interactions (the solution enthalpy, assuming it is positive). Electrostatic interactions compete with kT (thermal jostling). Under physiological conditions, long range interactions are strongly screened by intervening solvent molecules and ...


2

Nernst equation is the only way of solving this problem. Let's consider the example of the reduction of permanganate. The half-reaction is: $$\ce{MnO4- + 8 H+ + 5 e- -> Mn^2+ + 4 H2O}$$ The potential can be written as: $$E = E^\circ + \frac{0.059}{5}\log \left(\frac{\ce{[MnO4-][H+]^8}}{\ce{[Mn^2+]}} \right)$$ If you want to see explicitly ...


2

The good mnemonic tool to remember is : Anode = anabasis, electrons would be going upwards from the electrode to the wire = oxidation, ( Xenophon, Anabasis, 404BC, "The journey upwards(to north)) Cathode = cathabasis(the journey downwards), electrons would be going downwards from the wire to the electrode = reduction That means a cathode/anode is the ...


2

is it true that if I connect an aqueous oxidant to an aqueous reductant via a wire, will a current flow along the wire? In particular, does current flow in the following scenario? No true. Nothing will happen as the circuit is incomplete. The oxidant or the reductant species have to see each other "face to face". Guess what is the most powerful reducing ...


2

It is an interesting question. Daniel Harris is revising his book with my former mentor. Hope he clarifies this section in the revised version. Your point number 1 is misleading. The reason is that before the titration, theoretically there is no Fe(III). So Nernst equation should not be used- electrode potential is infinite (log 0 is undefined). When you ...


2

It is known that an electrochemical impedance spectra can be modelized with series-parallel combination of resistors and capacitors elements. What is more, for a given impedance spectra they are an infinity of different combinations of R-C elements which accurately model the same complex impedance. Similar observations are commonly done in the field of ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible