11

There are two ways in which the band gap of a material: using optical spectroscopy and using electrochemistry. The way you go about analyzing the data to determine the band gap is independent of material, but the process of collecting the data is very specific to your material, and you should consult papers where others have made similar measurements on ...


10

Yes, you can "convert" this way, but you're correct to be skeptical. Let's start with interpreting the cyclic voltammetry curves themselves. (figure from Wikipedia) Note that the "peak" actually has two sides. When you sweep the potential with CV, the cathodic peak ($E_{pc}$) and the anodic peak ($E_{ac}$) won't exactly line up. If you have a well-behaved,...


5

It is certainly possible for metals, including copper, to corrode in non-aqueous environments. The details depend on the precise nature of the solvent, electrolytes, and other potentially complexing species present. For example, in polar protic solvents (like water) that don't have any complexing ligands for copper, the equilibrium potential for copper ...


4

Perhaps your observation is an indication of irreversible reaction conditions. More specifically, a tight deposit on the electrodes hampering the advancement of the electrochemical reactions. This happens sometimes with some less soluble organic dyes used organic electronics, too. Take a look if the electrodes are still shiny, maybe they need to be cleaned ...


2

Try to use command "repeat n-times", that will make n-data files and each can have 30 000 points.


2

I think you may be coming at this question from the wrong angle. Since I'm not entirely knowledgeable about electrochemistry, I'll give a somewhat qualitative answer, the general idea of which I hope to be understandable. Fundamentally, what you are doing is taking a system containing a species, say $\ce{A}$, and its oxidized form $\ce{A+}$ (of course this ...


2

Without a proper reference electrode, knowing what potential your ferrocene/ferrocenium couple will show up is quite impossible. You should sweep a larger potential window, until the solvent breakdown potential on either end. As Michael Dryden suggested, you should sweep slower as well. That will help with the signal getting resolved easier.


2

It actually does work. Carbon fiber electrodes are just more useful for the neuro work that fast scans are popular for these days. Here is an example from the literature of a metal electrode used up to $3*10^6$ V/s , Amatore et. al. JEAC


1

the background limits ‘are the potentials where the cathodic and anodic currents start to flow at a working electrode when it is immersed in a solution containing only an electrolyte added to decrease the solution resistance (a supporting electrolyte). Bard's book is notoriously complex. Some bright scientists are not good at communication. Richard Feynman ...


1

Testing capacitors is almost always done with a two electrode setup. There are some details here about interpreting the data, but the experimental setup is that you just connect the counter and reference electrode inputs together to one half of the capacitor and the working electrode input to the other. A three electrode setup is used when we only care about ...


1

You are right that the counter electrode must balance the redox reactions happening at the working electrode. For every electron that goes to reduce an $\ce{Fe^3+}$ ion at the working electrode, an electron must be collected from an oxidation reaction at the counter electrode. What that reaction actually is depends on a lot of things. First, we must ...


1

I'm having a hard time understanding fully what the question is asking. I think the answer to the question is that there is an energy associated with the full oxidation of whatever chemical you are working with. So basically, the more you oxidize the working electrode the easier it becomes. In situations I'm familiar with, you form a layer on the working ...


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