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Yes , the solute particles are homogeneously spread throughout solution so when we take a spoonful of solution , the number of solute particles in the spoon is less than those which were present in solution. Molarity is an intensive property of a solution so it remains same no matter you calculate it by taking a solution filled beaker or by taking only a ...


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Molarity is simply a ratio between the number of mols of a solute within a liter of solvent. So, a 1M solution tells us that there is one mol of solute per liter of solvent. If I take half a liter, 0.5 L, I will also take along with that half-liter 0.5 mols of solute. However, the molarity hasn't changed, as it is still 1M. If your question is: are there ...


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From Wikipedia: Osmolarity = osmolality * (ρsol − ca) where: ρsol is the density of the solution in g/ml, which is 1.025 g/ml for blood plasma.[5] ca is the (anhydrous) solute concentration in g/ml – not to be confused with the density of dried plasma p.s. I am surprised that the osmolarity and osmolality differ that much in numeric value. For other (non-...


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