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It depends on the wick. A flammable wick, exposed to oxygen, will burn, but a non-flammable wick, saturated with liquid wax, could be chilled by the gas flow, and when the evaporated wax is blown clear of the wick, the candle flame could extinguish for lack of fuel. Basically, the oxygen flow might (at sufficiently high velocity) remove the vapor fuel so ...


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Volatility ( even if by thermal decomposition ) is the necessary, but not sufficient condition for liquids to be combusted, forming a flame. Liquid helium is the most volatile liquid ever, but there is no way to burn it ( chemically ). As other answers mention, there is correlation, as flammable liquids are generally less polar and more volatile than polar ...


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Many volatile liquids are not combustible Dichloromethane (DCM) is a widely used solvent by chemists. It boils at around 40°C (the same as diethyl ether) but is not remotely combustible or flammable. Ether is both very volatile and very flammable, so much so that most labs would prefer not to have it used anywhere where flames or sparks could be present. ...


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Not always true. Tetrachloroethylene ("perc", as it is sometimes called in the dry cleaning business) is not inflammable, but quite volatile. Carbon tetrachloride, which was also a common solvent some decades ago, is yet another halocarbon solvent that is volatile, but not inflammable (hence its former use in fire extinguishers). In general, volatility and ...


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There is no "if". Unless you add an oxidizing agent, there will never be a flame in the first place. So everybody who starts a flame, without much trouble and possibly without giving it much thought, is already adding an oxidizing agent, and a pretty powerful one: $\ce{O2}$. With good chances, whatever else oxidant you wanted to add will be worse than ...


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Rather than design something that offers danger of overheating, carbon monoxide poisoning, gas and over-pressure explosion, etc., why not use an off-the-shelf "instant" tankless water heater, available from sources such as Home Depot, Amazon or Lowes? Find one certified for your area. Making your own is a tankless task!


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What I suggest is we can use Gay Lussac's law of combining volumes of gases. According to this law, 2 volumes of acetylene reacts with 5 volumes of oxygen. From the balanced equation, the ratio between volumes of gaseous reactants and products are in the ratio 2:5:4. 2 volumes of $\ce{C2H2}$ requires 5 volumes of $\ce{O2}$. The volume of $\ce{O2}$ used for ...


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