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21

After the lengthy back and forth perhaps an official answer is due: the blue salt deposit on the camera battery holder door is most likely copper(II) hydroxide by reaction of leaked alkaline battery electrolyte (likely $\ce{KOH}$) with copper metal in the battery door contact. It could possibly also consist of copper(II) carbonate hydroxide formed by ...


17

If the stench is caused by putrescine or cadaverine, then you are in luck! Both putrescine and cadaverine are amines ($\ce{RNH2}$), which react with acids to form water-soluble ammonium salts ($\ce{RNH3+}$). Most soaps, surfactants, and other cleaning products are basic to help remove fats and oils (by hydrolysis). Try white vinegar, which contains acetic ...


15

Of course, you’ll want to prevent a spillage as well as possible (making sure the bottle doesn’t fall over etc.) but sometimes you just run into bad luck. Let’s hope that your work bench is at least capable of withstanding the acid for a minute or two — if you have a tiled working surface that would be preferred since they will almost certainly withstand. ...


15

Foam is a side effect of using a tensio-active agents (though some tensio-active agents are engineered to produce as little foam as possible, e.g. in washing machines). In fact, you could consider that, if soap has nothing better to do, it will form foam. This answers some of your questions: foam does not (really) carry away dirt and its percentage of ...


13

If you are right, and the smell is coming from an amine, then you may need to clean a lot more than you have. Even if you think you've done a thorough cleaning, amines have very low odour thresholds. I can't find specific numbers for putrescine and cadaverine; however, another amine generated in decaying animal protein, trimethylamine, has an odour ...


13

I agree with @BuckThorn on the blue corrosion but I'd like to address the sticky substance. If it is in fact a degradation product of the plastic or some other substance being exuded by the plastic, I've had good luck removing these with oil-based cleaning agents. None of the cleaning products you mentioned will help very much in removing a nonpolar organic ...


11

Since you stated: I'm not a chemist, so I don't have any strange chemicals at home. you will neither have facilities for their proper storage and waste management. Consequently, the only reasonable solution is: Get some new test tubes (about 0.20 Euro for a 160 x 16 mm tube), but don't risk your own health or pollute the environment by messing around ...


10

Safety regulations in every lab I have heard of strictly disallow mixing of containers of any sort that contain, have contained or will contain chemicals with containers of any sort that contain, have contained or will contain food, beverages or anything else intended for human consumption. You should never drink out of a bottle that had contained chemicals, ...


8

There may be two different factors at play here. First, it isn't necessarily the water that is doing most of the cleaning. I presume the water is used to wet a cloth and the cloth then wipes the surface. So the cloth may then physically remove surface contaminants. The role of the water may be just to improve the cloth's surface contact hence improving its ...


8

There are several laboratory techniques to rigorously clean glass. Here are a few of the more common ones, to add to the other answers. There are probably more procedures, and it's also common to perform more than one treatment to maximize efficiency. Practically none of these have any use at home, because they are too dangerous, too expensive, and just ...


7

Regardless of what it takes to remove any traces of hydrochloric acid from the drum, the container is probably not certified as food-grade. So in addition to any risks from the acid itself (including things like heavy metals, which are common contaminants in mineral acids), the plastic is not certified to be free of toxic substances left over from ...


7

The solvent appears not only to have removed paint on the keys but also to have caused solvent crazing in the plastic itself. Regrettably, there is probably not much that can be done to actually remove the crazing, which may have penetrated too deeply to remove by buffing, but you might be able to hide it with a substance such as an oil that has the same ...


7

Acetone is quite good at dissolving polymers. Do not use acetone on plastic before checking out whether that plastic can withstand acetone. Let it dry for a couple hours. Try turning it on again. If it does turn on, good. If not, you're pretty much screwed. However from what I can see from the picture you didn't really damage anything vital. You can try ...


7

Caustics such as $\ce{NaOH}$ and $\ce{KOH}$ are effective in converting insoluble fatty acids in organic fats and oils into soluble soaps in a proccess called saponification. The caustics also react with cell membranes, DNA and RNA, destroying undesired yeasts, bacteria and other microorganisms. That said, caustics react with the glass itself, removing the ...


6

Yes, this is a good explanation. Rain water is almost pure water, it lacks of bivalent ions such as $\ce{Ca^{2+}}$ and $\ce{Mg^{2+}}$ which helps soap to rinse of. You will get the same effect when a water softener is installed on water distribution.


6

Disposal isn't a problem - add more water as you dump it down the drain. There are two extremes to ooblek: Almost all cornstarch and almost no water: this is a dry solid or slightly wet starch. No big deal. Almost all water and very little starch: this is some water with a little bit of starch mixed in. Sometimes it clumps or falls out of suspension, but ...


6

That is a valid question, because acid rain has been known to damage paints, particularly high-gloss, i.e. clear coat. Best would be to test the effect of vinegar on a hidden area, and double-check under bright light from different angles. Your idea to test on glass is good, because it shows how long a soak is needed. If it appears unaffected, rinse ...


5

Assuming clean means anti-pathogenic, I would use Hydrogen Peroxide "oxyclean" since it can "clean" metals by removing pathogens. $\ce{H2O2}$ is marketed in various strengths. 1% dilution can kill up to 99.99% bacteria in 30 seconds. Any butyl based cleaning product is a very good degreaser but it may harm rubber products. Check here and here for more.


5

There are a couple of ways to do it depending on what chemicals are available to you. Since sulfur melts around $115~\mathrm{^\circ C}$, you might first melt it and let as much liquid drip out of the test tube as possible in order to make the following step easier. Perhaps the most straightforward method involves toluene or xylene which you can probably ...


5

As a disclaimer, this is for information only. Anyone using this information assumes all associated risks. The manufacturer's label should be followed for any cleaning products. The exact chemical composition of the goo is not precisely known. It is likely either tar or creosote existing as some form of hydrocarbons. These hydrocarbons are tangled up to ...


5

To see these jelly flakes in an ultrasound bath is a normal thing -- referring to ``it happens regardless if the water was tap-water or deionized water, a just a matter of time''. Perhaps this occurs faster in the former, than in the later, especially if the bath is used to clean glassware. But it equally happens with glassware judged as clean (by eye) for ...


5

Well apart from the fact that the answer depends on the type of the paper that is used. Secondly how much is wasted and also the process used. Below is an article that might be helpful in answering the question Some industry sources estimate that an ordinary sheet of paper made from cellulose fibers derived from wood can survive only four to six trips ...


5

The lowering of surface tension is a side effect, though it does relate to the reason why we use soaps when cleaning things. Many of the things we want to clean are not naturally soluble in water (e.g. things like vegetable oil). The structure of soaps and detergents usually consist of molecules with two parts: one is water-loving and one is oil-loving. ...


5

From this Wikipedia article Isopropyl alcohol dissolves a wide range of non-polar compounds. It also evaporates quickly, leaves nearly zero oil traces, compared to ethanol, and is relatively non-toxic, compared to alternative solvents. Thus, it is used widely as a solvent and as a cleaning fluid, especially for dissolving oils. You should try Googling ...


5

Vinegar Test: No Visible Change After Two Hours As advised above, I decided to test vinegar on an inconspicuous spot. First I created a pattern of exposed paint using masking tape. The shape was just something random that I thought I could most easily recognize, even if just a slight difference in the car's finish: Then I placed vinegar-soaked cloth on ...


4

In most of the case distilled water is enough, but you should be sure that there are no salts inside your object if you can perform a Conductometry test on the washing water follow this procedure: Wash the item inside a buck for 3 minutes with distilled water measure Conductometry, take another bucket with the same amount of water wash the item for 3 minutes,...


4

There's no technical reason why you couldn't make a powdered dishwashing detergent and I suspect that someone probably does sell it, just as there are liquid, tablet, and powdered automatic dishwasher detergents and laundry detergents. It does seem more convenient to use a liquid detergent for washing dishes in the sink. A liquid doesn't need time to ...


4

Removing all of the debris from the stones without damaging them can be difficult, the following is what I've done in the past to clean geodes with debris and deposits. Your mileage may vary, especially since we don't know exactly what is on your stones. Soak the stones in soapy water for a day or so, then scrub them thoroughly with a stiff brush to clean ...


4

The "professional" solutions here in the US are often fluorinated paints. My understanding is that the graffiti literally slides off and people give up after a few tries. Given the costs, my suggestion would probably be a thick layer of polyurethane. These are often applied to seal wood floors and can be transparent or stained. If you apply multiple layers (...


4

I don't know if it's practical to dissolve or otherwise stabilize acetone peroxide, but I could see absorbing nitroglycerine with sawdust or trapping it in gelatine, rendering it more stable, which is how dynamite is made. Certainly if it can be done safely, detonating in place is be the preferred solution for dealing with unstable explosives. It's done ...


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