Hot answers tagged

8

Resonance structures are one model that explains bonding, but not a very good one Resonance structures are widely misunderstood. Individual resonance structures are not real compounds that exist, but an approximation that assumes all structures are made from bonds consisting of two electrons. The true structure of a compound is thought to be an average ...


5

First things first: the bonding orbitals of $\ce{I3-}$ do not contain any significant d-orbital contributions. In fact, the $\ce{I-I}$ bond lengths are significantly longer than in $\ce{I2}$, suggesting a lower bond order. In fact, the triiodide anion should rather be imagined as a 4-electron-3-centre bond (bond order approximately 0.5) which might be ...


4

Expanding on Jan's reference to three-center four-electron bonding: When the three iodine atoms all come together in a line the overlap among all three atoms gives the combination of $p$ orbitals rendered thusly (source: Wikipedia by Arun Sridharan): Only the lowest orbital gives a bond but, because it involves overlapping all three atoms instead of just ...


1

Introducing the idea of "infinite atomicity" can be useful to highlight the importance of particle size on the properties of metallic or network covalent solids. As the surface to volume ratio of discrete particles becomes sufficiently large, properties of crystalline solids such as melting point, absorption wavelength and reactivity begin to diverge ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible