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5

Mathematically For a buffer solution containing a weak acid and its salt with a strong base, buffer capacity is given by $$\mathrm{\beta = 2.303 ( [H^+] + [OH^-] + \frac{C_{buff}.K_a.[H^+]}{([H^+]+K_a)^2})}$$ It should be noted that the third term in the expression, $\frac{C_{buff}.K_a.[H^+]}{([H^+]+K_a)^2}$ is independent of temperature (see this answer ) ...


2

The protein structural terminology in your question needs some work. For example "protein in primary structure embedded in a plane" - the primary structure is the sequence of the protein, and it is not clear how that would be embedded in the plane. Perhaps you mean embedding the graph corresponding to the atomic structure? Pulling back, however, ...


4

To question (1), the short answer is yes, such scenarios do exist, but they are rare for m greater than 10 or so due to the large number of possible sequences and the high frequency of substitutions even in very closely related proteins. Those that do exist are often encoded by the same gene, and the deletion of parts of one polypeptide (producing a "...


1

Let's start with defining the terms. The sample region is the portion on a lateral flow immunoassay that receives a sample (of blood, urine, oral fluid, ...). This has often been treated to adjust the sample's pH, viscosity, ionic strength, or protein content. The conjugate release region is the portion on a lateral flow immunoassay that holds immobilised, ...


1

HDL might not be more easily oxidized than LDL. From Lipids Health Dis. 2005[1]: Our findings are in line with the studies by Bowry[4], Suzukawa [10], Schnitzer [11], Ohmura [12] and Raveh [9], who have come to the conclusion that HDL is more easily oxidized than LDL. In other studies, HDL has appeared to be less prone to oxidation and even to protect LDL ...


-1

please check out our paper we published already in 2008: Chances and pitfalls of chemical cross-linking with amine-reactive N-hydroxysuccinimide esters. Kalkhof S, Sinz A. Anal Bioanal Chem. 2008 Sep;392(1-2):305-12. doi: 10.1007/s00216-008-2231-5 Another paper on NHS ester reactivity is this: Stefanie Mädler, Claudia Bich, David Touboul, Renato Zenobi, ...


1

Since you understand how aspartimides (succinimides) form and why are they a problem in solid-phase peptide synthesis (SPPS), I'm not going to elaborate it further. Your main question is why don't glutamic acid residues face the same problem? Then, my question is who said they (glutamic acid residues) won't? Of course, they do. One example is discussed in ...


9

What you have given is: $$\begin{array}{c|c} \hline \dfrac{v}{[S]}, \ \pu{s^{-1}} & v, \ \pu{mol dm^-3 s^-1} \\ \hline 0.257 & 5.15 \times 10^{-2}\\ 0.895 & 4.48 \times 10^{-2}\\ 2.00 & 3.35 \times 10^{-2}\\ 3.59 & 1.8 \times 10^{-2}\\ 4.82 & 0.48 \times 10^{-2}\\ \hline \end{array}$$ Michaelis-Menten equation for enzyme ...


5

Prerequisite knowledge A proton is deprotonated when the $\mathrm{pH}$ exceeds the $\mathrm pK_\mathrm a$ of the proton. Analysis There are 3 different forms that an amino acid can exist in. For the sake of simplicity of analysis, I am taking the simplest amino acid - glycine. $$\underset{\mathrm{glycine}}{\ce{HOOC-CH2-NH2}}$$ Continuing to state the ...


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