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It has already been pointed out that your text is incorrect. Saccharose (commonly known as sugar) is not an ionic compound yet it dissolves very well in water. It is not alone although I am too lazy to think up a non-carbohydrate example. I’ll also point out that ionic compounds exist that are insoluble or poorly soluble in water, although some may rightly ...


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One solution would be to reduce the amount of solvent (under vacuum for instance), then filter out the precipitated NaCl at high temperature (at higher temperatures NaOH has as much as >10x the water solubility of NaCl). The common ion effect will play in your favour, as the high water solubility of NaOH at higher temperatures will help you reach NaOH ...


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The claims in the video are surely exaggerated: protection for 6 months? In a garage, perhaps. The video claims that the hydrophobic silica - $SiO_2$ - is activated by water. The final product is applied to a wet car body with water droplets severely beaded up - i.e., already hydrophobic from the pretreatment washing agent and rub. So, the hydrophobic agent ...


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Alcohol fermentation is the formation of alcohol from sugar (or glucose). Yeast, when under anaerobic conditions, convert one glucose molecule $(\ce{C6H12O6})$ to two molecules of pyruvic acid $(\ce{CH3C(=O)CO2H})$ via the glycolysis pathways, then go one step farther, converting each pyruvic acid into ethanol $(\ce{CH3CH2OH})$ and carbon dioxide $(\ce{CO2})$...


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It seems to me like the task description is wrong, like if they maybe do not consider the decrease of mass of the liquid. As the volume increase due lower density is well compensated by the mass decrease. If I do not count with decrease of the solution mass, I can get the final volume $\pu{55 mL}$. Note the $x$ is the glucose conversion factor. $x-0$ means ...


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You have 1/84 + 2/106 moles (twice as many sodium ions in a mole of carbonate as in bicarbonate) of sodium ions from the carbonates. Add that to the (0.45 x 0.154) moles of sodium ions from the NaCl. This is your total moles of sodium ions. The total volume of solution is (0.05 + 0.45) L so divide your total moles of sodium ions by 0.5 to get the ...


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I think using acetone will be helpful. Acetone will evaporate fastly and it is polar and can form hydrogen bonds to the detergent powder like water. Though you need to use much acetone to wash all detergent powders and after that, wait for some minutes for acetone to vaporize from your machine.


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Chromium(III) ions are like Fe(III) and Al(III) ions. Exactly like aluminum and ferric carbonates, chromium(III) carbonate does not exist in aqueous solution. In principle it could be obtained according to $$\ce{2 Cr^{3+} + 3 CO3^{2-} -> Cr2(CO3)3}$$ But like with the aluminum and ferric carbonates, the chromium carbonate is immediately destroyed ...


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There's a really good video on YouTube by Nilered/Nileblue on ferrofluids. In it he suspends magnitite with oleic acid (main component of olive oil) as a surfactant and uses Kerosene (Paraffin Oil) as a carrier. There's a PTFE 'dry lubricant' sold under the WD-40 brand name that might be able to prevent the glass from staining as it creates a thin coat of ...


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