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In hopes of helping others that have the same question, I think a have a partial answer. From https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/B9780124095472111497 "Traditionally, electrochemical double-layer theory has been concerned with the so-called ideally polarizable interfaces, at which by definition no electrochemical reaction takes place and ...


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@MatNX, as you state, "sensitive technology and high temperatures are typically a very bad match." However, there is no magic way to "make" cold, only to move heat from one location to another. Presumably, since you state you have an engineering background, you're familiar with the laws of thermodynamics. Any heat you remove from an IC ...


1

I could not find any verification of an industrial plant using this technology. The closest seems to be the plants in development by Carbon Engineering, which are planned to use a potassium hydroxide solution for the carbon dioxide capture step. Their proposed process then precipitates the carbon from solution by addition of calcium hydroxide, yielding solid ...


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Per this source, a good account of the actual product of dissolving $\ce{AlCl3}$ in a large volume of water: If aluminium chloride is dissolved in a large amount of water the solution is acidic, but this has nothing to do with formation of hydrochloric acid. The solution contains hydrated aluminium ions and chloride ions: $\ce{AlCl3(s) + aq -> [Al(H2O)6]...


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If you want that in an equation, is rather simple: $$\mathrm{nMg(OH)_{dissolved} = [Mg^{2+}]*V}$$ you can justify that piece of math with the dissociation equation itself. Please, note that we don't have any concentration of solid, because it doesn't make sense. What you have is the amount of solid that was dissociated into magnesium and base. Some random ...


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To add further to your question, for a silver diamine dental product (Riva Star by SDI), the white precipitate disappears after applying more potassium iodide to the mixture. The excess solution in the tooth cavity is then rinsed off with water. There is some cool chemistry going on here but I am unsure what it is. Riva Star comes in 2 solutions that are ...


2

This is a reasonable question. Basically it asked whether the pre- or below-boiling-point vapor composition can be different from the liquid composition, although they are known to be the same at the boiling point according to the property of azeotropes. We can come up with a right answer by the following careful thinking. You are looking at a bottle of ...


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