4

You discuss two different phenomena, solubility and concentration gradients due to gravity. Solubility can be explained using the concept of entropy. Solubility requires the the free energy of a solid be higher than the corresponding substance dispersed in solution. Surprinsingly perhaps, additional entropy associated with dispersion of the solute in the ...


3

I believe have found a answer. It's valid mathematically, make sense physically but I don't know if chemically is true. I posted to community appreciation. There we go! The reactions ionization of weak acid: $$\ce{HA + H2O <=> H3O+ + A-}\qquad K_\ce{a}=\frac{\ce{[H3O+][A-]}}{\ce{[HA]}} \tag{1} \label{eq:KWeakAcid}$$ ionization of weak base: $$\...


3

Q1: The equilibrium concentration c of a gas in a solution (typically water) which is present in the atmosphere with partial pressure p dictated by Henry's Law: $H_{cp} = c/p$ where $H_{cp}$ is Henry's coefficient for that specific gas. This law states that the concentration of the gas in the solution is directly proportional to its pressure in the ...


3

Supplemental answer for additional background/insight: Biologists generate salt gradients in test tubes all the time using high-speed centrifugation, which allows them to produce much higher potential energy gradients than gravity can, and in an environment free of ocean-scale mixing and temperature gradients. If the concentration is close to saturation ...


2

How a titration curve is affected when a poorly soluble salt is formed? If by "I think that titration curve don't be affected" you mean that the graph of pH vs volume of strong base will not be affected by the precipitations, then you are right. This is because the species that form the precipitate are not part of any other equilibrium reaction. how to ...


2

It's hard to pinpoint what the problem here is since I don't have the mentioned book to compare an answer with. The simplest way is write down half-reactions for reduction (red) and oxidation (ox) processes once you've assigned oxidation numbers (denoted above the symbols of the elements which are participating in a redox reaction), then balance the number ...


1

The $\mathrm{p}K_\mathrm{sp}$ value of $15.69$ for $\ce{HgCl2}$ given by your reference must have an error. First of all, $\ce{HgCl2}$ is fairly soluble in water at $\pu{20 ^\circ C}$. Wikipedia lists it as $\pu{65.7 g L-1}$, yet lists solubility of $\ce{Hg2Cl2}$ as $\pu{3.25e-4 g L-1}$. Meantime, I found an University of Arkansas, Little Rock website, which ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible