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If you know the composition of any sample of compound, is it possible to predict it's flame test color? By current standards, unfortunately not. The calculations will be extremely complicated. If you recall, there are > 92 natural elements. The flame test works only for a few elements, so basically it is a useless test today. The Bunsen burner flame is a ...


4

Prediction of color is different thing to prediction of emission spectrum, as the former is subjective. Even if we could accurately predict the radiometric emission spectrum, color evaluation, based on summary evaluation of photometric spectrum would be on experimental subjective assesment with multiple conclusions. Especially if women are involved. We men ...


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In a mixture of electrolytes, conductivities and conductances are additive. Let's consider the beginning of the titration, with maybe $0.01 M ~\ce{HBr}$. Its molar conductivity $\Lambda_0$(HBr) is $350 + 78 = 428 ~ \mathrm{S~ cm^2/mol}$. Its conductivity is : $\sigma$(HBr) = $ \Lambda_0 $(HBr) c = $\Lambda_o$(HBr) $0.01 = 4.28·10^{-3}~ \mathrm{S/m}$ . Please ...


2

In principle, yes. In practice, it is much more complex (and you don't need to do it as others have already made the observations) The colour of a flame test is a consequence of the combination emission lines from electronic transitions in the flame. Most useful lines are narrow and involve transitions in isolated atoms between different electron orbitals. ...


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