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20

Yes, you can use a common stove to test for cations. But a stove is designed to minimize the risk of incomplete combustion (which could lead to production of carbon monoxide), hence its flame always appears as an intense blue flame. Such color contamination could be problematic when testing for cations. In contrast, the combustion (and the color of the flame)...


5

Flame emission (or better atomic emission) does not care whether your starting compound was ionic or not. Everything decomposes into flame either into atoms or very simple molecules. The blue color you see from the flame is also from very small molecules which exist in the flame. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Spectrum_of_blue_flame.png Ordinary flame ...


5

This terminology is specific to EPA and it is not universal, because there are so many legal issues associated with any environmental analysis. They have to be extremely careful at each and every step (it may cost someone millions because of a wrong analytical result). Hence the reason for various "blanks." The language of those methods is official and the ...


4

Lehrbuch der analytischen und präparativen anorganischen Chemie by Jander et al. [1] suggests to precipitate borate with $\ce{Ba^2+}$ in neutral solution beforehand as barium(II) thiocyanate is one of the few barium(II) salts actually soluble in water, or use an excess of $\ce{Fe^3+}$ to make sure all the interfering anions are precipitated. From [1, p. 358]...


3

When you ask how to remove borax, I assume it is Sodium tetraborate decahydrate (Wikipedia). Thus, I agree with @andselisk of using $\ce{Ba^2+}$ solution to precipitate it. Even though it is seemingly an excellent answer, the reference given and the text body are in German, and I didn't understand it much. :-) Thus, I want to give some clues to make it sense....


2

First of all, check the expiry date. In general HCl solutions are secondary standards. 1 N is just a approximation. You need to standardize it every time with a primary standard such as sodium carbonate. On the other hand, constant boiling HCl is indeed a primary standard. It is not very well known, perhaps because modern analytical chemists have become ...


1

As you have calculated, 500 ml of a 10 % HCl solution contain about 1.44 mol HCl. Thus the concentration is about 2.9 mol/l. Therefore, you cannot prepare this solution by diluting a solution with c = 0.5 mol/l HCl.


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