4

Let R be the ratio of number of Na atoms to number of Fe atoms. Then, for the first compound, we have $$\pu{R = }\frac{\pu{112300 ppm } /\ \pu{22.98977 g mol^{-1} } }{\pu{357200 ppm } / \ \pu{55.845 g mol^{-1} } } = \pu{0.7637 }$$ Since there are two Fe atoms in the compound, the Na number for the first compound is simply 1.527, i.e., twice the value of R ...


3

Your dilution approach can be heavily improved. Rule no. 1: 2+2 $\neq$4 in solution preparation from an analytical chemist's perspective. An extreme example is that you add 50 mL of water+50 mL of ethanol $\neq$ 100 mL solution. If you add a solid NaCl to 1 L of water, the volume may not remain 1 L. It may decrease! Analytical dilutions are always ...


2

I did the experiment. My buffer was a commercial product a simple packet of salts probably phthalate based. I made it up in deionised water to the right volume then measured its pH with a simple all-in-one probe-meter I measured the buffer neat and then again after 1/5 serial dilutions. I rinsed the probe with deionised water between readings. The pH fell ...


2

Answering this question requires a preliminary discussion of the solubility product constants of three silver halides and the formation constants of three silver complexes. First, note that $\ce{AgCl}$, $\ce{AgBr}$, and $\ce{AgI}$ are all insoluble in water, but insoluble is a relative term in the end. Their respective solubility equilibria and solubility ...


2

The last time I calibrated an absorbance spectrometer, it was one I made from parts (for an undergraduate Instrumental Analysis teaching laboratory) and I used a 0.0509 M holmium chloride solution I prepared. The visible region spectrum I obtained is here: Holmium solutions are well known as UV-Vis calibration standards and you can purchase from, e.g., www....


1

These are the absorbance spectra of copper sulfate in water (open markers) and heavy water (filled markers) (1): The absorbance in water is maximum at 780 nm, as stated in the reference. From the spectrum, the molal absorption coefficient, at 780 nm, appears to be approximately 12.5 $\mathrm{(mol/55.51 mol \ of \ water)^{-1} cm^{-1}}$ with aquamolality ...


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