12

"Hydronium" content can be easily determined by simple acid base titration. Keep in mind that there is nothing fundamental about pH. It is just a convenient scale for expressing hydrogen ion concentration. For example, a kilogram is a recent invention for expressing mass measurement, it does not mean that ancient people did not weigh anything ...


12

Yes it is corrosive to skin. The Safety Data Sheet identifies it as Category 1A for skin corrosion, which means: A substance that, according to animal data acquired from a scientifically validated method, produces irreversible damage to the skin after an exposure of three minutes or less, and within one hour of observation, in at least one of three animals....


7

In these Safety Data Sheets for $\ce{Ca(OH)2)}$ and for $\ce{CaC2}$, both compounds are rated at "Causes serious eye damage – Category 1" and "Causes skin irritation – Category 2". That said, $\ce{CaC2}$ is often sold as pellets or "stones". Because of large particle size, only a small amount of $\ce{Ca(OH)2)}$ is produced at a ...


4

The problem in ortho-aminobenzoic acid is that the acidic hydrogen of carboxylic group is H-bonded with the lone pair of nitrogen in amino group. As a result it is more difficult to extract it compare to that in para-aminobenzoic acid since the H-bond must also be broken during acid-base reaction. Para-aminobenzoic acid does not have a H-bond due to the ...


2

To be said at first: There is no real displacement. There is an equilibrium reaction of a weak acid/base and their salts, that form mutually a conjugate pair acid/base ( like acetic acid/acetate or ammonium/ammonia ). All is then matter of chemical equilibrium. The stronger acid is, the more is it's dissociation equilibrium in favour of its anion and vice ...


2

Although the phenolate ion has more resonance structures (4) compared to acetate ion (2), acetate is more stable because it has two equivalent resonance structures of same energy. I would argue the phenolate ion has five mesomeric structures, two with the charge assigned to oxygen (analogous to the two resonance structures of phenol), and three with the ...


2

Tips and hints would be greatly appreciated. My tips and hints for you (I apologize for if my tips and hints direct to me treating OP as a novice): Your dibasic acid is $\ce{HO2C-(CH2)n-CO2H}$. Thus, $\ce{A^2-}$ in the equation $(2)$ of Karsten Theis's answer is $\ce{^-OOC-(CH2)n-COO^-}$. Molar mass of this dibasic acid is: $2 \times (12+32+1) + 14n = 90 + ...


2

The reaction of ammonia and acetic acid would gives you ammonium acetate, $\ce{H4N+CH3COO-}$ (Wikipedia). Thus, it is hard to image reliable $\mathrm{p}K_\mathrm{a}$ value of acetic acid in ammonia. Keep in mind that $\ce{H4N+CH3COO-}$ in acetic acid decomposes upon distillation to give acetamide, $\ce{CH3CONH2}$ (Ref.1). Ammonium acetate, on the other hand, ...


1

Since you have not given any values some of the important values need to be considered as variables, Also assuming its a monobasic acid $\ce{HA}$ $$\ce{HA_{aq} <=> H^+_{aq} + A^-_{aq}}$$ The important values are the Acid dissociation constent $K_A$ Initial concentration $c$ Writing the equation for the acid dissociation constant $$K_a = \ce{\frac{[H^{...


1

This question and the one referenced by Mithoron address NH$_4$HF$_2$ as an entity in itself which must be examined as a whole. It is easier conceptually to rewrite the formula for the compound as NH$_4$F.HF. Consider adding NH$_4$F to water: you get a pH near 7. In a separate container, add HF to water (~0.1 M); you get a pH ~1 https://ehs.princeton.edu/...


1

You need to write out all the possible equilibria just like you do in the case of a multiprotic acid like Phosphoric acid. You will also need to have a pKa for every equation. The bifluoride ion will obviously dissociate in water


1

Suppose one of the doublets of one C=O bond moves to one of these two atoms. It will not be to the Carbon atom. The Oxygen atom is a better choice. And now this Oxygen atom would be negatively charged. As a consequence the Carbon atom is positively charged and has a vacant orbital able to accept a lone pair, for example from an $\ce{OH-}$ ion or from water. ...


1

I genuinely have no clue how to start a chemical equation with something like $\ce{HOOC(CH2)_nCOOH}$. Tips and hints would be greatly appreciated thanks. The only thing that an acid does in an acid/base reaction is to lose hydrogen ions. You can write the neutralization of a monoprotic acid with $\ce{NaOH}$ like this: $$\ce{HA(aq) + NaOH(aq) -> A-(aq) + ...


1

You should keep in mind that the concept of acid-bases is not restricted to water. Lewis acid definition is applicable to gaseous, aqueous and non-aqueous systems. Consequently, all Bronsted-Lowry acids are Lewis acids. The idea applies to bases. Note that the converse is not true just like an apple is fruit but not all fruits are apples. The idea of litmus ...


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