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This tag should be applied to questions concerning acid and base reactions. An acid is capable of donating a hydron/ proton (Brønsted acid) or capable of forming a covalent bond with an electron pair (Lewis acid). A base on the other hand is a chemical species/ molecular entity having an available pair of electrons capable of forming a covalent bond with a hydron/ proton (Brønsted base) or with the vacant orbital of some other species (Lewis base).

2
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Acid dissociation constants in general are the equilibrium constants that describe acid dissociation reactions. So for: $\ce{HA + H2O <-> H3O+ + A-}$ the equilibrium constant would be $K_a = \frac{ …
answered Feb 26 '16 by Jason Patterson
3
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First off, your thinking about the titration volume of a dilute solution vs the concentrate from which it was made is correct. Why we don't need to worry about water acting as an acid or a base in th …
answered Nov 2 '14 by Jason Patterson
4
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If pure hydrochloric acid is added to a sample of pure copper, there is essentially no reaction; the solution should not turn blue. At a guess, you're seeing the copper turn pink because it has a s …
answered Sep 9 '15 by Jason Patterson
2
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Phosphoric acid dissociates into hydrogen ions and $\ce{H2PO4^-}$ ions in water. This then can dissociate further, but $\ce{H^+}$ and $\ce{H2PO4^-}$ are the primary ionic species you'd find in a phos …
answered Sep 22 '14 by Jason Patterson
4
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The source of the acid shouldn't matter much in adjusting the pH by a small amount. What is the source of the calcium carbonate? If it is dissolved calcium carbonate only, as you might find in har …
answered Dec 3 '14 by Jason Patterson