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Applicable to questions about heat, energy, work, and their interconversion in chemistry. See the tag wiki for a detailed list of topics. Questions tagged may also be tagged with [enthalpy], [energy], [free-energy] where appropriate.

10
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Don't blame yourself. This is a badly-worded question. Products and reactants don't have "heat content", they have thermal energy. I.e., heat is not a property of substances—they don't 'contain heat …
answered Aug 7 by theorist
1
vote
There are actually two school of thought on this. One is that residual entropy (the entropy a substance has as a result of not being a perfectly ordered crystal at $\pu{0 K}$) is a thermodynamic en …
answered Aug 12 by theorist
1
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Using Mathematica, I obtained $T=546 K$, as follows. One of the nice things about using Mathematica for physical calculations is that it has the ability to understand/keep track of/cancel out/convert …
answered Aug 18 by theorist
7
votes
2answers
I'm looking at a textbook question (Engel & Reid, Thermodynamics, Statistical Thermodynamics & Kinetics, 4 ed, Q3.1) which states the following: The heat capacity $C_{\mathrm m,p}$ is less than …
asked Apr 16 by theorist
0
votes
0answers
The purpose of the original Joule (as opposed to JT) expansion experiment was to assess intermolecular interactions in real gases. In that experiment, Joule immersed twin glass globes into a water ba …
asked May 3 by theorist
2
votes
1answer
Suppose we carry out a reaction in a bomb calorimeter whose starting temperature is $298.15\ \mathrm K$. Here we assume $\Delta V$ is close enough to zero that we consider the process to be at constan …
asked Jan 25 by theorist
0
votes
I did find this paper from 2005 in which Zielkiewicz estimates the molar entropy of water at $\pu{298 K}$ [1]. It's behind a paywall, but the subsequent correction from 2006 is not [2]. This gives a …
answered Feb 18 by theorist
2
votes
"Since change in enthalpy ∆H = Q + VΔP, it seems that enthalpy and heat flow (Q) are not strictly the same thing." First, note that, when you write "∆H = Q + VΔP," you are assuming the only type …
answered Jun 29 by theorist
10
votes
1answer
o) ... is used as a superscript in the notation of thermodynamics to indicate an arbitrarily chosen non-zero reference point ("standard state"). The language used by Wikipedia suggests it was …
asked Jan 27 by theorist
1
vote
3answers
I thought it would be fun to get an idea of how enormously large $W$ in $S = k\ln W$ is. I'd specifically like to estimate this for a mole of water at $\pu{1 atm}$ and $\pu{298 K}$. To do this, I nee …
asked Feb 18 by theorist